1.25.2011

Blasian Lit Thread #5: Snap Shot

Here's a book with a Blasian theme that stands out. Snap Shot by Miss J aka Jeanette Williams-Smith is an inspirational romance featuring a Blasian couple. Also I believe the hero is of Vietnamese origin which is also new (to me).
"Former major crimes detective Hollister Liano finds himself seeking redemption from his crime by taking care of classy fainter Rosaline Welsh, a freelance photographer carrying around more than just her camera. She is holding the photographic evidence of a murder involving her abusive ex-boyfriend and a dirty cop in the same police department... Ultimately, these two broken people learn that wholeness comes from a higher source..."
I have a copy of this book but haven't found the time to read it yet. I'm kind of bummed about this as I really wanted to write a review. 

Snap Shot is available in Kindle format on Amazon.

11 comments:

  1. After reading the comments, I'm quite weary of Rosaline. I'm not exactly sure why a Black woman's personal turmoil has to be the plot device in a majority of these blasian books. Interestingly enough, many (not all) of the Asian men though seem to be written as damned near perfect.

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  2. Interestingly enough, many (not all) of the Asian men though seem to be written as damned near perfect.

    I think that's a common thread among romances in general; the leading man is almost always some sort of demi-god perfect being. The Twilight series is infamous for this trope.

    I'm not exactly sure why a Black woman's personal turmoil has to be the plot device in a majority of these blasian books.

    This is common across I/R fiction where BW are concerned (haven't read any where the main female character was a non-BW, so I can't say that it's a staple plot device in that genre). It comes across as if a BW has to have some sort of trauma (cheating ex, crappy childhood, etc) before she can plunge into the Worl' of the Swirl.

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  3. @Hateya

    I've noticed this as well! It is quite disturbing that the Black women are portrayed as suffering from one thing or the other while the Asian men are perfect. It'd be better if both leads were flawed and came together to heal rather than the Black woman always lacking in some way or the other.

    @leoprincess

    I tend to avoid romances like the ones you've mentioned, most of the ones I read have two strong leads.

    It comes across as if a BW has to have some sort of trauma (cheating ex, crappy childhood, etc) before she can plunge into the Worl' of the Swirl.

    You've got a valid point.

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  4. I don't like this notion of "being rescued". Yes, it has its romantic element, and when mixed in with well-written humor, there's potential for greatness.

    But the truth is, most modern women neither need nor want saving. And most men are not interested in saving women; we're all adults, we've all got problems, we've all got bills and obligations, so it's understandable why some people would be uninterested in saving other people.

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  5. Comments from the author of "Snap Shot" Ms. J

    I will admit, I had to bite my tongue a little tongue as I remembered that everyone is entitled to their own opinions.

    "Snap Shot" was not written as a means of promoting the suffering of black women.

    It cuts me as the author and as a black woman to think that my goal was to showcase Afro-American Rosaline in a negative light while placing Asian Hollister on this cloud of perfection.

    Rosaline may have come off as more flawed than necessary, which I do apologize for.

    My goal with Snap Shot was to show the underlying message of "two broken people can not make a whole thing" by illustrating that both Rosaline and Hollister were flawed people who could not help each other, but they could only find wholeness and peace in the will of God (because "Snap Shot" is inspiration and romantic, speaking about love on all levels).

    Then again, if no one gets the message, then I have failed the readers of this site and my own readers (especially if I have to explain the meaning. That means no one understands that message sans me.)

    I will consider such commentary in the future and hope to use these words as a means of improvement.

    Just remember, I am a flawed author trying to write perfect fiction.

    Thank you all.

    Ms. J, author.

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  6. @Ms. J

    I haven't read your book because this tomboy doesn't particularly go for romance novels. Throw God in the mix and I'm pretty much gone, says the agnostic girl who grew up in the Bible Belt.

    I merely read the comments of those who did read your work. They interpreted Rosaline as broken and Hollister as damned near perfect and this pattern is prevalent in the genre whether it's intentional or not. The same can be said of the one-sided culture lessons that only favor the Asian male. I mean this in general because I don't know if you've included this aspect in your work.

    More importantly, though one of the reviewers was disappointed by Rosaline, she enjoyed the overall story and said she'd read/buy more of your work.

    Then again, if no one gets the message, then I have failed the readers of this site and my own readers (especially if I have to explain the meaning. That means no one understands that message sans me.)

    This isn't entirely your responsibility. My personal god of literature, Soseki, said that readers are also obligated to try to understand the message the author is conveying.

    I will consider such commentary in the future and hope to use these words as a means of improvement.

    Thank you signing up to explain your motivations. I respect and appreciate you coming. A part of me though is ambivalent about this statement because I personally don't think authors should interact directly with their fans or potential fans because in doing so you risk deviating from your intended path in order to appease a few. I started to feel this way after seeing my favorite television shows utterly decimated because the writers listened to a handful of vocal fans. Even some of my favorite authors fell into this trap.

    Despite only being a writer and not an author (*bows to Amaya*), even my fanfiction goes through several brutal rounds of beta-testing via my friends. Their ultimate goal is to help me write my stories to best of my seriously limited ability. Rather than getting tongue stitches, I incorporate their protests directly into what I'm writing. If nothing else, I get well-rounded pieces even if readers complain.

    In closing, now that you're here among us, maybe we can help each other because it is never ever my goal to hold another Black woman back. Crap + Sheep mentality = the end of us all.

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  7. @ Hateya:

    Sorry if I sounded super-sensitive. Writing a work is like a having a child--nobody can talk about your baby but you.

    I realize that 'Snap Shot" will not appeal to all flavors and all readers but before anyone comments on anything, I prefer them to read the work first and then comment.

    But we all like to avoid picking bad books books so I understand that.

    Plus, I like to write with my audience in mind but I'm not trying to tailor to the audience only. I need to like what I write too.

    Thank you all for the feedback, good and not so good.

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  8. @ Ms. J

    Welcome.

    I haven't read your book either, and my comments were also about the literary trend, not your work. Some of the weariness on this post, I think, is leftover from the Blasian Lit #6 where the latest batch is making folks rub their temples.

    You are an incredibly level-headed woman, by the way. Some commenters from months past could stand to learn a lot from you.

    I hope you continue to write Blasian books, cuz honey, there's quite a demand.

    Peace.

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  9. @Ms J,

    Sorry if I sounded super-sensitive.

    We understand. Given that I mentioned the name of your character mere seconds before I rejoined the broader conversation about disturbing patterns in Blasian literature, it makes sense that you'd feel compelled to defend your work. As Ankhesen explained and linked in the post above, the second half of my original comment was related to the discussion we were having in Blasian Lit #6. As such, the other members who responded were reacting to that comment, not specifically your story or your characters. I'm sorry for this misunderstanding.

    I'm sure the first person here to read your book will give you honest and insightful feedback.

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  10. @ Hateya and Ankhesen Mié :

    Level-headed? Whoa. I certainly did not feel that way when I posted my comments.

    My critique group and editors had done a good job on giving it to me straight as far as feedback. I'm still growing as a writer. So any feedback I get does help.

    I agree, more Blasian lit is needed and not just romance lit. (I'm just a romantic and old softie. So romance is my thing. Blame my crush on a cute Filipino dude in high school. That certainly shaped a lot of my writing.)


    At least this blog exist so that these things can come to light.

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