6.16.2011

Audrey & Dre (2011) ~ Episode 1

And so it begins.

11 comments:

  1. I need the next episode, like, yesterday.

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  2. Though I like this show, I wish it is a little longer like at least 10 minutes per episode because I know this will be such a good show. But yeah, the guy that plays Dre, very hot. I wish they could be on television but of course Hollywood won't allow it. But, if they did it would be cancelled after the first season or a few episodes.

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  3. I mean Andrew Chen.

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  4. Dun Dun Dun...I cant wait for the next episodes.

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  5. I love the set-up so far, Can't wait until the next episode!

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  6. Is this all of episode one or only the introduction to episode one?

    I'm looking forward to a lot of things, especially the opportunity to compare and contrast a fake Blasian relationship with a real one. I'm also equally interested in the dynamics that play out between a Blasian couple who are from the same country, who speak the same mother tongue and who generally share the same societal values.

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  7. Where is the rest? How often do these come out?

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  8. @ Hateya

    Is this all of episode one or only the introduction to episode one?

    This is Ep. 1 in its entirety.

    I'm looking forward to a lot of things, especially the opportunity to compare and contrast a fake Blasian relationship with a real one.

    You may be disappointed because this wasn't conceived as a "Blasian" show, and Andrew Chen reports he was strictly trying to portray an everyday type of guy.

    @ Umrao

    I wish it is a little longer like at least 10 minutes per episode

    You and me both.

    @ DN

    Ms. Kelley sends me email alerts for the show. I'll post them as soon as she lets me know when they're up.

    This was a mean way to open up the show. I was really eager to dive in already. Andrew Chen was looking so good right there.

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  9. @Ankhesen

    Your responses have brought up more points of curiosity.

    You may be disappointed because this wasn't conceived as a "Blasian" show, and Andrew Chen reports he was strictly trying to portray an everyday type of guy.

    Is there such a thing as a "Blasian show" concept? If the term "Blasian" means a relationship between a Black woman and an Asian man, then this show is indeed a Blasian one, even if by default. The actors, the writers and the director should bring us something different from the norm and if not, then we should be concerned.

    What exactly is an everyday type of guy? In Hollywhite vernacular, this usually means "white" guy.

    In the end, the only way this show can disappointment is if I perceive these characters to be simply white people dipped in brown and yellow substance.

    Zuri is Black; Andrew is Asian. There's a possibility, regardless of what's written in the script, for them to stumble upon some of the real issues that an interracial and intercultural couple face. I'm seeking those things that exist beyond their cultures, traditions and screwed up family members. I'm talking about the means in which communication takes place between the couple themselves. If the actors can channel this, it'll be fantastic. If they don't, then I'm sure I'll come up with more musings.

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  10. @ Hateya

    If the term "Blasian" means a relationship between a Black woman and an Asian man, then this show is indeed a Blasian one, even if by default. The actors, the writers and the director should bring us something different from the norm and if not, then we should be concerned.

    And we should.

    Here's what I've noticed about actors of color. They want to have successful careersin HollyWTF and they don't want to get them by playing stereotypical roles. They erroneously think that the best way to accomplish this is to "leave race out of it."

    Notice how in my interviews, no one really want to talk too much about racial issues or really want to delve too deeply into "the Blasian thing" (except for Sam and Dora).

    Meanwhile, audiences of color, such as us, by all means want our actors to bring race into it. Why? Because we want them to portray issues which affect us on a daily basis, issues which Hollywhite would rather pretend don't exist.

    Which brings us to this:

    What exactly is an everyday type of guy? In Hollywhite vernacular, this usually means "white" guy.

    Actors of color, whether deliberately or subconsciously, often forget this. It's like they have stopped seeing themselves as "everyday" types and don't want to feel like they're "making a statement." This tends to frustrate audiences of color, because again, we want them to make a statement. A statement sure as hell needs to be made.

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  11. kind of short but not a bad start

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