11.11.2011

China in Africa by Edward Bishop

Find below a video on 'China in Africa' with ACTUAL opinions of Africans and no mention of 'what does this mean for the West' in sight, finally.



This new video is six minutes of Ghanaian-Chinese engagement and includes some input from the awesome Deborah Brautigam

5 comments:

  1. I did like the video, and strongly believe in forming ties in order to overcome most of the prejudice and stereotyped ways of thinking among people in the world. I was not surprised when the Chinese woman who first spoke in the video said that most Chinese people look at Africans as dumb. We all have different perceptions of each other, and for centuries the black man has been depicted at the lowest end of the 'civilisation scale', never mind their systems of quick mathematics or their inventions (because you never hear of a black man having invented anything - even though the black man has).

    The only way to completely obliterate marginalisation is through integration. In my opinion, most people think in a certain way because they have no choice - since they are practically surrounded by that way of thinking. But if they are introduced to a new way of thinking, they might think differently.

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  2. I like to see clips like this.

    I admit, I was a little miffed at what the Chinese woman said about Africans,but Chika is right. Her thoughts comes from ignorance...not knowing about Africans and other Black people. Too often , Black history is hidden in most non-Black countries and the things that are taught about us are negative without nobody correcting it. I'm quite sure that the woman wasn't taught anything good about Africa in her Chinese classroom

    The pictures of the kids also intrigued me. As long as their parents don't have any racist poisons in them, these kids will be able to see each other as people.

    I'm thankful for blogs like these. If I were to go out( and have on one occasion) say that there is a historic connection with Blacks and Asians, I would get laughed at. They may be ignorant of it,but I'm no longer am. It would have been nice if my history lesson would have included this because it's always interesting reading stuff like this. Some may say you're just saying that because of the AMBW "phenomenon". No, we really did have a connection,but once again ,we were deprived from knowing it.

    It seems that time is repeating itself. I hope that it continues.

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  3. @Chika

    I liked that the woman was honest and despite her words, she seemed to have some nice things to say towards the end.

    The only way to completely obliterate marginalisation is through integration. In my opinion, most people think in a certain way because they have no choice - since they are practically surrounded by that way of thinking. But if they are introduced to a new way of thinking, they might think differently.

    Excellent! IMO people tend to be, I don't know, scared of daring to challenge accepted ways of thinking and moving outside the box. Thanks for sharing.

    @Ankh

    I know! I've seen the exact scene in real life. Last year I was dragged by my friend to a children's party at a private hospital and there was a Chinese baby boy there dancing with the other Nigerian kids. The only difference is that in my experience, it was the baby boy chasing all the baby girls. I thought it was cute.

    Btw, I've finally read 'The Woman From Cheshire Avenue'! It was an interesting read, I look forward to reading more from you.

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  4. @M
    Black history is hidden in most non-Black countries and the things that are taught about us are negative without nobody correcting it.

    You're absolutely correct. This is why it's absolutely imperative, we go out into the world and tell our INDIVIDUAL stories to other INDIVIDUAL people.

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