4.29.2012

She's Got to Be Mixed with Something...

I was over on YouTube stalking checking out the natural hair videos and couldn't resist clicking on a Monsieur Nov video.  Now, I really should have known better, but I couldn't help taking a quick peek at the comments and...well...let's just say that I shouldn't have.  Surprisingly, there were only a few that made me do a double-take, but believe me, they were more than enough. 

In the video for his song "Trop Fresh", Monsieur Nov croons to a drop-dead gorgeous woman in that soulful, sexy voice that never fails to send shivers down my spine.  The passion and chemistry between these two stunning people fairly oozes off the screen and there is absolutely no mistaking that want each other something fierce. 

Naturally, cue the instantaneous, seemingly irresistible urge for someone to assert with all the authority of a professional geneticist that the woman can't be black, isn't black or must be mixed with something.  Or better yet, she's just really, really tan.

Uh...huh.


Okay, first, that's my new favorite song.  And second...lawd!

*ahem*

Now that I've gotten that out of my system, here are the comments that made me roll my eyes so hard I think I might have actually seen my brain.  Please keep in mind that all of the these comments were made by the same person over the span of a few months. 

I tan exactly like them, you are the one that is wrong. I am just trying to correct you because it's important for people to know that there is another race that exists that people mistake to be related to the people born with black skin. This woman was not born brown. Both of them are related to Navi Rawat.
1 day ago         
Actually I deleted my comment and I am related to both of them and I have met both of them in person. I have tanned darker with them too.
1 day ago         
You know, that woman is Asian. She's only tan.
This man, tans JUST like her.


Um...isn't Monseiur Nov of East Asian descent?  But I digress...

According to the commenter, it's perfectly natural that Monsieur Nov would portray this particular woman as his love interest because they're the same.  They're both Asian, so it's perfectly okay for him to be attracted to her.  So...what?  A black woman wouldn't be okay?

Now, I've never made it a habit of worrying about every little comment that's made on the 'Net because I value my sanity and good health.  But in some instances, I can't stay silent.  And in this case, let's be honest here:  This has nothing to do with whether this particular model in this particular video is black or not.  Not really.  It's really all about denying and negating black beauty, black worth and the fact that we deserve to be loved and cherished just like anyone else.

It's the almost insatiable need to downplay our appeal, undervalue our femininity and marginalize our very existence.  And the fact that the commenter felt such a burning desire to return to this video time and time again to repeat the same thing over and over again, tells me far more than the actual words ever will.

57 comments:

  1. Now, Aknh, you know better than to check comments on anything race related on YouTube, Yahoo, etc. That's a recipe for hypertension.

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    Replies
    1. Darn it. That should be Cinnamon, and not Ankh.

      Delete
    2. LOL. I hear you. I was actually seeing if everyone was a blown away as I was by the sheer awesomeness of the song, but--bam!--there they were. I'm used to seeing stuff like that, but the tanning thing, and the multiple postings by that same commenter just tripped me out so badly, I had to write something.

      Delete
  2. Cinnamon, comments will make your blood pressure go up, always have the blood pressure pills at the ready. I'm surprised they let people comment on the video I know usually on some of his video's the comment section is closed.

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  3. Naturally, cue the instantaneous, seemingly irresistible urge for someone to assert with all the authority of a professional geneticist that the woman can't be black, isn't black or must be mixed with something. Or better yet, she's just really, really tan.

    OMG - you read that too????

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  4. No offence but it is not that serious. I can't believe you take random youtube (or any comments on the internet) comments to heart like that. To be honest for every negative comment directed at black girl in a non black guy's video you can find a negative comment about a non black girl in a black guy's video. This whole woe is me, I am an unappreciated black woman, victim mentality that some black women on the internet have is draining. I guess we all have different experiences because me and my friends, who are all black, get enough male attention, black and non black, to not concern ourselves with trivial youtube, yahoo comments by anonymous nobodies. Real life experiences> online b.s. Black women are valued and appreciate by the people that matter most. I would not get so invested in what jealous, anonymous women online have to say. I wish some of us would stop internalizes the black women are undesired, everyone is out to get us and devalue our beauty garbage because it is not true. Remember nobody can make you feel inferior without your consent. I'm not coming from a mean place but I still expect this comment to be deleted.

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    1. @Kitty

      Didn't take as you being mean...you have your opionion, I have mind. If that's the way you feel, that's fine, but sometimes I can't stay silent. This was one of those times. The fact that the person felt that they needed to come back time and time again to say the same thing brought on this post. Not necessarily one comment in particular. It was the totality of it that made me react. Believe me, if I wrote a post everytime I saw a comment that was derogatory to black women, I'd be writing a post everyday. And I don't have the time nor the inclination.

      I too have never lacked for male attention...of any race. I know my value and my worth and I love being a black woman. And in the grand scheme of things, I don't care what an individual hiding behind a keyboard thinks of me. But I do care how society treats us and I find that I need to call BS out when I see it. The way we're treated on TV, in film and in the workplace all stems from the way that this particular commenter thinks and it needs to be called out or we'll keep on getting whitewashed Hollywood and stories of how black women are poor, loaded with disease and need to marry white because no one else wants us.

      For you, it might be one thing, for me, it was these partcular set of comments. And I'll callit it out again and again and again if and when I feel the need to.

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    2. And as eye-rolling ridiculous as an internet comment might be, it still contributes to that ugly hierarchy that has placed BW at the bottom. That this hierarchy exists means that these kinds of things need to be said regardless of how much male attention you're getting and how you may value yourself. It's why the Narrative exists.

      If only our worlds were isolated to the people that matter most. How easy would that be? Does your landlord matter to you? Does the doctor carving KKK into your body while you're sedated for heart surgery matter to you? And the slew of people who stay silent or try to diffuse it when it happens? And who's to say that those who matter to us aren't racist? IE. the parent opposed to your asian boyfriend or black girlfriend.

      Cinnamon doesn't need to defend herself here. This village exists for her and what she said up there.

      Delete
    3. *Applauds* Thank you Julie <3

      Delete
    4. I agree with Julie. We should not get into the habit of dismissing these things. They do matter and these attitudes will still go on in the future if we don't address them today. Besides, if one is frustrated then it is only healthy to discuss what is on your mind. You are not being a victim. It can be empowering and you are equipped with the tools on how to deal with these issues when they come up.

      AC

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    5. "Woe is me" is that "Waaaaah" approach, the "I'm so hurt & offended approach."

      This, however, is the Cinnamon Approach, best known as the "Fuck You." The youtube comments are laughable. How threatened and pathetic do you have to be type out that complete and utter bullshit?

      By all means, haters are meant to called out for what they are: desperate, pathetic, racist haters. Just like they exercise their right to say something, we need to say something back.

      That's Black a woman in bed with Nov right there. It's a Black woman he's sensuously crooning to in "Tous le Jours, Tous le Soirs", just like it's a Black woman in damn near all his other videos.

      That would be check and checkmate.

      Delete
    6. That's Black a woman in bed with Nov right there. It's a Black woman he's sensuously crooning to in "Tous le Jours, Tous le Soirs", just like it's a Black woman in damn near all his other videos

      And this is the reason why most of the comments on his videos are turned OFF. Enough of this bullshit already. I get tired of black women being asked to "Get over it", and "Its not that serious." This is why I love the Narrative and The Black Girls Club. There are so few safe spaces for POC to discuss how WE feel with out someone jumping in and telling us to close our mouths.

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    7. Exactly. Why ARE the comments turned off, if not b/c trolls are coming out in force?

      Delete
    8. @Julie, Nicole, Ankh

      I co-sign with everything y'all have said. Why are we the only ones never allowed to say anything about anything that's said or done to us ever? If we push back against the racism that's spewed at the Obamas, we're racist. If we voice our concern about the whitewashing that's going on in Hollywood, we're imagining things. If we call out the constant black-woman bashing that's become all the rage lately, we being overly sensitive and insecure. And if we scream for justice for the unjustified killings of our black brothers and sisters, we're race hustlers.

      So when are we ever supposed to speak up? When it's too late? When white people tell us that it's okay to do so? Sorry, but we can't afford to do that. People who harbor that kind attitude cast movies, sit on the boards of Fortune 500 companies and litter the halls of Congress and the Senate like pick-up stix. For now at least, they make the rules that impact what society sees of us (through the news, movies, TV, politics, etc.), and it's up to us to speak out when we're being shit on. Those who stay silent shouldn't be surprised when there'll be no one left to speak out when they need someone to have their backs. *smh* Ain't that the way it always goes?

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    9. Wow cinnamon, what you've just said echoes a lot that I've been thinking about Jeremy Lin. He's one celebrity among hundreds of celebrated celebrities and yet when I decide to celebrate him, people find it alienating. Yea. Like I'm going to let them tell me if I'm allowed to celebrate. I know that road, it leads to whitening cream, submissive asian porn, whitewashed movies, appropriation by hipsters and murder without justice.

      Monsieur Nov is my hero. You too cinnamon.

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    10. So when are we ever supposed to speak up? When it's too late? When white people tell us that it's okay to do so?

      PREACH.

      Delete
  5. Have any of these women like the one mentioned on her ever thought why Asian men like Monsieur Nov have Black women/darker woman in their videos?Maybe they do because 1)They maybe attracted to them 2) If they are from a homogeneous society , the may see darker skin as something exotic to them 3) They are diversified pepople

    My brother and I had a talk about the women that he dated all the various races of women he dated. When it cam to White omen he said that if he preferred the ones who had dark hair or red hair. When I asked him why told me that red hair looked exotic on them and darker haired women were not placed on the same level as a blond haired women, which he felt was being overplayed to the point that he lost attraction.

    Even me, when it comes men, I'm attracted to all,but when it comes to non Black men, I more attracted to non-White POC's or if they are White, they are " White ethnics"(olive complexioned like Albanians,Armenans Italian, Greeks or White Jewish men). Even with White American men, they have to be dark haired/ red haired. I grew up during in during the Farrah Fawcett era in live in a mostly White community. Back then, nobody was exposing the beauty of Black or other POC's during those times. I had to rely on EBONY/JET and my folks to instill it in me. I remembered when my folks did get around to finding Black women like Beverly Johnson, Iman, Jane Kennedy or Judy Pace , I thought that were far more exotic and prettier. Menwise, t was the same. I didn't think of Richard Roundtree's or the late Howard Rollins dark skin as being ugly , I just hoped that my husband would be as hot as they were.

    My attitude is pretty much like this today. I'm grateful for what my parents and even what my grandpops instilled in me because if not I would have been singing the same song of how White skin is so beautiful and don't get me wrong it can be,but so can darker skin. My folks didn't want me or my siblings to grow up thinking there was something wrong with being different or in this case... is ugly.

    Like my brother if you overplay something , it becomes very bland to me. Although I try not think of people like that, I cannot help but to feel that way. I remembered blond hair blue eyes being shoved down my throat until the point that it's not as appealing to me as it once was.Maybe that is part of the reason why these guys may do it.

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  6. This is something I see a lot when it comes to beautiful black women OR children for that matter. I've had people look at my daughter and say, "Oooh she's so pretty is she mixed?" and she isn't. Her father is a black man. Its almost like two black people can't produce attractive/beautiful children.

    You have the right to voice your views on the matter Cinnamon. I hate when people try and police other people's feelings. This colorism thing is real and happens way too often. It needs to be addressed. I'm happy you did this post.

    Like M I've noticed that when white men/asian men date black women they are usually dark-skinned black women. Its a pattern that I've seen while I'm just walking down the street's of New York. Dark skin is just as beautiful as lighter skin. I grew up in a home that celebrated blackness. I was born and raised in Harlem, and you can't get any blacker than that! My dolls were black and most of the books I read as a child had black children in them. I remember when Santa came to our school when I was in Kindergarten- he was black. I will never forget that as long as I live. I grew up surrounded by cultural centers that celebrated who I was as a young black girl. It had a huge impact on me and my self-esteem.

    Like M, most of the Non-Black men that I find myself attracted to are other MOC. I went to school with black, Asian and Latino men, so that's my preference in terms of dating. White men just aren't on my radar. And again, like M, if I do find myself attracted to a white man, he usually ahs dark hair and very dark eyes (Greek, Italian..) One of my ex's is Filipino/Japanese and we've remained close friends till this day. He mentioned how white standards of beauty were shoved down his throat as well, but he's always dated black and asian women.

    Again Cinnamon thank you for bringing this conversation to the narrative.That's what this space if for.

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    1. "You have the right to voice your views on the matter Cinnamon. I hate when people try and police other people's feelings. This colorism thing is real and happens way too often. It needs to be addressed. I'm happy you did this post."

      @Nicole I agree. These things need to be talked about more, within minority communities. Colorism plays a big part in how many girls feel about themselves. Whether it's on the internet or in real life these things affect our communities and how we look at ourselves as a whole. And everyone deserves a safe place to voice their feelings when something problematic happens, without being called "overly sensitive" or being told they're "playing the race or victim card".

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  7. Wow...feeling a kinship here. Grew up in a Black city (New Orleans) with people who looked like me....so my confidence in me and my race, color were set at an early age. So whites have called me uppity....and I say ya damn right I am....Ditto to what the others have said....white meat just don't do it for me....If I am attracted to white it is Italian or Spaniard.....love skin with color...so very sexy to me....skin with hue, dark hair, and dark eyes....yum

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  8. It's the almost insatiable need to downplay our appeal, undervalue our femininity and marginalize our very existence.

    What you said, Cinnamon. Many of the comments made about Black women of African descent (as opposed to those mythical Black women from "other" places), often border on being pathological. They absolutely hate the fact that we exist on this earth. Oddly enough, they go through great lengths to get our skin, our hair, our lips, and even our asses.

    @Kitty
    I wish some of us would stop internalizes the black women are undesired, everyone is out to get us and devalue our beauty garbage because it is not true. Remember nobody can make you feel inferior without your consent.

    I'm not coming from a mean place either, Kitty, but your comment is replete with bullshit, pure and unadulterated. Why? Because you think Cinnamon's reaction and ours are solely based on whether or not non-Black men find us attractive. Real women, real honest to God Black women are being physically raped, tortured, brutalized and psychologically terrorized worldwide because others have these attitudes.They have gotten into the habit of not even recognizing that we're people, Homo sapiens, and treat us accordingly. How in the hell can long suffering Black women stop internalizing their feelings of unworthiness while the rest of the world is EXTERNALIZING it relentlessly?

    Imagine a world where a Black woman is free to voice her pain and never have to worry about another Black women stabbing her in the back, shutting her down, snatching her voice.

    Just in case you missed the memo, Kitty. Black women will not be silenced at the Blasian Narrative.

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    1. Real women, real honest to God Black women are being physically raped, tortured, brutalized and psychologically terrorized worldwide because others have these attitudes.

      Bin...go. Bin-friggin'-go.

      People need to know that while they can run their mouths, a verbal or physical ass-kicking may very well be the result. These people either want you to say silent or whine about how offended/hurt/insulted you are. What they don't want you to come out swinging.

      That's why it's always the unarmed getting attacked and/or killed in the news. When folks know you got a piece on you, they're hesitant to try something. Getting shot/stabbed/overall havin'-yo'-ass-whooped is never part of the plan.

      Delete
  9. Everyone has said everything so I leave this quote here

    "When you are silent about your pain, they'll torture and kill you and say you liked it."

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    1. Aiyo

      *applause* excellent quote.

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    2. Excellent. Where's that from?

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  10. I live in a country where women use chemicals to change the colour of their skin to look more white and being dark skinned is a no no. Reading about black women who are proud of themselves and hold themselves in high regard it gives me comfort. Very rarely I hear the beautiful dark skin being celebrated, it get me truly excited.

    I wont forget the day I saw a beautful dark skinned woman in an place where other women bleach their skins. She stood out and I'm sure I was accused of being gay that day caz She was veeeeerrrrrry pretty and sexy. I had to stare in amazement. I'll never forget her natural long hair or the dark complexion she had and how beautiful it looked. I felt jealous and wished I had her skin.

    I am happy that I am being celebrated somewhere and it doesn't have to be by another race (I am colour blind). As I said, in my country, which is predominantly black I am not celebrated for being me. My heritage is a mixed one and often I over looked for my light skinned-whiter-looking cousins. So hearing someone stand up and defend me (black women) I am proud.

    We don't have to respond to all instances but we cannot remain silent.

    SER

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    1. Well said.

      This wasn't about educating the troll. Fuck trolls. This was about building up POC.

      The trolls are out there; this we already know. We don't give a fuck about them; we give a fuck about strengthening us. We set an example by not internalizing the self-loathing, and by not chanting "woe is me." And it is not a message strictly for Black women; this is, after all a Blasian blog. We have our share of female Asian readers who understand perfectly well where we're coming from.

      So, WOC, collectively say "fuck you" to the trolls. They can sit in front of their mirrors and wish they were a WoC. They can sit in front of their mirrors and secretly wish they had that dark which won't age for decades and decades. Let 'em bleach all the want; once they reach forty they'll know some next-level regret.

      Delete
  11. I've just read those comments via the video you linked here (I happen to mainly watch Monsieur Nov's videos that have mostly French comments).

    Now, it's good to do something about your thoughts and expose them here in order to fight back. I have nothing against it though I understand what Kitty said. My only point is that speaking up here ain't gonna do anything for us out there (I'm replying to what one or two members said here). I'm done with calling out people on their bullshit when it comes to online stuff (I used to be a bit active on an Asian forum). In real life, it's another story.

    That's it. Again, I'm not opposed to rants, it's usually healthier than internalizing.

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    1. Don't be so hard on yourself, speaking up here is gonna have a major impact on how you carry yourself and think about things critically 'out there'. And in case you haven't noticed, that wasn't a rant. It was a discourse about the value of skin color. What Kitty said, now that's a rant.

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    2. @Myra

      Never underestimate the power of "here" because it's really just a microcosm of "out there." And "here" should never, ever be taken for granted.

      "Here" helped pressure the state of FL to do the right thing and take another look at George Zimmerman when nearly three million people from all over the world signed an online petition demanding justice. "Here" makes it less possible for those in power to use propaganda to paralyze and cower those who don't have any. "Here" is a place for the poor, the disenfranchised and the downtrodden to have a voice and for their voices to actually count.

      That is what "here" does. That is what "here" means. And "here" scares the hell out of the tyrants and racists and the intellectually incurious. They hate when people speak up. They loathe when people fight back. They want you to ignore them, because when you do, that is when they can do the most damage. They tell a lie, and because you're smart and you know it's a lie you shrug and move on. But what about the less smart person that doesn't know it's a lie? By speaking out, we could educate that person, then they'd educate the next person, and that person would educate the next. It's a delicate, tedious and admittedly frustrating dance, but one worth having.

      I'm not foolish enough to think that I can control what other people write when they huddle with their keyboards and type out their racism for all the world to see, but I can control what I contribute to society. And as long as my fingers work and my brain keeps functioning, I'm going to do my level best to counter ignorance the only way I know how: with knowledge.

      Both on and offline.

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    3. I co-sign. The days of racial intolerance and strife are far from behind us. No we may not be swinging from trees or told to use "colored only" – we knew how to combat those blatant forms of racism, only the years have changed. I always look under the surface. Racism is not as obvious as it once was. Don't become so complacent that you forget that comments like the woman left about the video is but a representation of the society as a whole. "Forgetting about it" is not an option for me and it never will be. Yes I have friends of other races, but they all get the side eye from me. You can say I don't trust or have faith in people, I say I'm a realist. I accept the situation as it is based on the truth of life and deal with it accordingly. The majority of us are content with the way things are. Just because you can't see the signs right in front of your eyes do not mean they don't exist. You know how we make things better - we speak out when we see or hear something wrong, we teach our children that it's okay to have an opinion and speak their minds, and we check those who disrespect us. I show them that I am smarter, stronger, and more humane than they are. You don't want to be called the "N" word, then don't make it acceptable to use. I have to laugh when sometimes when those who continually use the "N" word get upset when those of another race use it in everyday speech and toward us. Hell, don't get mad now, we don't "own" that word. I don't know about you, but I am no longer satisfied with grinning and bearing it. Sorry if I went off on a tangent.

      Here is one of my favorite quotes from Zora Neale Hurston:

      Sometimes, I feel discriminated against, but it does not make me angry. It merely astonishes me. How can any deny themselves the pleasure of my company? It's beyond me.

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  12. ...and the Narrative comes out swangin'.

    That's all I have to contribute; no need to be redundant.

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  13. The Narrative is taking it to church this evening!

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  14. The only videos I read comments if any on is funny kitten videos. It seems that YouTube is a bastion of racial hatred, even in topics that are often not even related to race (LOL except for kitten videos). At the end of the say I chalk it up to a serious case of "haters gonna hate."

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    1. I feel the same way about Yahoo news comments...well, pretty much any news organization's comments section unless the site is unambiguously center/left-leaning (and even then...).

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  15. I have never seen racist youtube comments and since when should skin color matter anyways? That doesn't define who we are.
    Well now there is a twitter bashing dark skinned people.
    :/
    What is this world coming to? It's 2012 shouldn't
    we be over this ish by now.

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    1. Sweetangel, are you serious? Because if you are, then you're either speaking from a place of isolated privilege or are clueless about what's going on in the world. Tell me I'm wrong, please, and that you're being facetious at best, or snarky at worst.

      With a click of the mouse, I could pull up dozens and dozens of YouTube links with racist commentary.

      I could argue that skin color doesn't matter...except I get asked on a regular basis what I'm mixed with because my skin is so light (and being a Southern girl; it's highly coveted)regardless of the fact that I consider myself black as an ace of spades. When my beautiful dark-skinned BFF asks me if I felt like I had privileges she didn't because of the difference in our complexions.

      I could say that skin color doesn't matter in 2012, but that's complete fucking bullshit. The couple currently holding down 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue are targets of pure visceral hate merely because of their skin color. If they were white, like all of their predecessors, then O & the flawless FLOTUS would be considered bastions of what white folks think the president and his boo should be.

      No, my skin doesn't define me. But it is the visible part of me; and I've become who I am in part of how people treat me because of it. And as long as there are PoC being assaulted, abused and straight-up murdered merely because they "look" a certain way, then this ish will never be over.

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  16. Wow. I've come back to a rather heated discussion. I guess everyone has different experiences because I don't feel the way you ladies feel. And that's ok, right? I'm sorry if I offended anyone.

    And to the poster, Sandra Robinson, who said that women in your country bleach themselves, where exactly do you live? Good grief. That is really horrible.

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    1. It's not the different opinions that's the problem or how these ladies "feel." But as people of color as sure as the sun will rise, every time we speak out on racism in any form, we get legions upon legions upon legions of mofos lining up to gaslight us, goalpost shift and tell us that racism doesn't exist, to get over it, and that it's all in our head and we're just looking for trouble.

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    2. Of course it's okay, everyone has a right to their own opinion. Now if your feelings are based on the fact that you have experienced acceptance for who you are as a person and not the color of your skin then good for you. If your experiences are based on the fact that you've created this bubble for yourself and tune all the ugliness of the society out well than all I can suggest is that you take an honest and hard look at the world around you. Though I may not receive daily attacks about being black, I can find an example each and every day that someone else does. And no you didn't offend me. I enjoy conversations on serious topics, keeps me sharp.

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    3. Small note: I don't really think it's really a question of where she lives. That stuff is marketed and sold in the US( as well as other western countries) in predominately brown areas. So it's not as far off as you think it is; But right in your own backyard.

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    4. Princesss you're correct. Here in New York, beauty supply stores have shelves filled with these kinds of creams. And all of them are sold in black hair care supply stores.

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  17. No I am not being facetious, I have heard of those comments but never came across them. I don't mean to come off as I don't care, I am just tired of seeing this stuff. I'm black as well and I just saw a very racist twitter and sucky part is I can't report her at all also she has like 16k of followers which makes it even worse. Because they all think it's funny which it's not. Yes I have seen videos bashing us on youtube and I am pretty well aware of the ish that goes on. Unless it's for spam. I've seen the videos on youtube fro Moc talking smack and so
    on and so on.

    So I don't mean to be snarky, I'm really sorry. I am just tired of seeing stuff like this and knowing I can do nothing about it. Also I couldn't recall any that I had seen. So forgive me if I offended anybody. :)

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  18. @ Cinnamon: what a heated discussion now...anyway, my point was that whatever we say here ain't gonna change the reality. It surely help us voicing our views in a safe place (blogs like this one) and educate ourselves mutually, I agree with that, but I still don't believe that it will change non POC's behaviour.
    I'm not going to reply anymore, I'm really not cut for this nor for educating other people (though I'm far from being a doormat nor naive), especially those I don't know. If you are, good for you, I respect that, but I'm not like this.

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    1. You're missing the point. We're not trying to "educate" non-POC. We don't give a fuck about them.

      The point of posts like these it offer a backlash for young women and girls of color who feel insecure enough as it is. Here, they can bullshit without dealing with any white whine. They can cuss quoted trolls sideways if they so desire. But most importantly of all, they can read blogs like these and know that they don't have to take this kind of shit lying down.

      It's like cathartic group therapy: if you want, you can come here and let it all out. If it's not your cup of tea, the Narrators post all the time, sometimes several times a day. Another post will be right along.

      We don't give a fuck about educating non-POC; that's not our job. The whole point of a blog like this is to expose people to new worlds, new thoughts, and to show them that not everything's about non-POC, and how they can all go fuck themselves.

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    2. Amen. I have found my sanctuary.

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    3. @Cendella Agreed! This is a sanctuary! I don't have to take blood pressure medicine after reading the comments section here. This is a safe place.

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  19. If it's not your cup of tea, the Narrators post all the time, sometimes several times a day. Another post will be right along.

    Exactly I agree. These individuals could leave a comment on some of the other amazing posts that been put up recently. Write some healing words for the Lakota elder who had KKK carved into his torso. The Narrative has a little something for everyone. If black women discussing colorism and racism in the cyber world isn't your thing you have other options.

    @Cendella- Me too! lol

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    1. God bless Mr. Traversie. Though true "justice" is becoming a bit of a mockery these I continue to hope that it come his way.

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    2. *Deep Sigh* Tell me about it M :-(

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  20. Sweet Angel, you've never seen a racist youtube comment? Lol Yea right! :) Racists make their way even to videos that have absolutely nothing to do with race. But they've never bothered me ever. I'm aware there are racists out there but I've always believed that their racism reflects more poorly on them than it does on me and I am going to shine regardless. So why get so worked up over them. Call me naive I guess.

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    1. I'm aware there are racists out there but I've always believed that their racism reflects more poorly on them than it does on me and I am going to shine regardless. So why get so worked up over them.

      Because not everyone is you. Make no mistake, I'm glad you are the way you are and I want more WOC to be like you, but not all are.

      This place allows WOC to express their feelings without someone coming along and telling them to shut up, or stop being so sensitive, etc.

      If the post doesn't apply to you, it doesn't apply to you. Lurk, and then wait for a post which does (Kitty, that was a general statement, btw. I'm trying to speak generally here).

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  21. You know I just found this blog and all I can say is that I'm breathing a sigh of relief! ROCK ON bros and sis's rock on!!

    Actually I take racism a bit personally because I am an African who grew up in an exclusively white neighborhood(cut off from my culture and people). Also, I attended an semi-private all white ALL GIRLS boarding school(can you say HOLY SHIT!!!). AS if that wasn't bad enough, I was the ONLY black girl in my ENTIRE school.

    So as I am sure any WOC can imagine, life was a living hell for me. Not to say that I don have white friends or anything, I mean I have met a select few(one to be exact ;P) who I though were possibly a little bit ok. But the rest of my friends, are either Japanese, Chinese or Thai!...literally! I have a few African friends from when I was much younger but I left when I was too young for it to matter much.

    So as you can imagine, I grew up with a slew of self worth/image problems(a real shame because not to toot my own horn or anything but I am one of the pretty ones). In order to fit in in my teenage years, I tried for the longest time to pretend like racism didn't exist but eventually I had to man up and remove the blinders from my eyes.

    Becaus of this I don't actuall think that the outright racism is much of a problem. What bothers me the most is the sneaky underhanded racism where the pretend like there's no problem and youre just too sensitive and SHIT! Because if you know there's a problem, you can fix it. But when they refuse to admit there's a problem then that means there's nothing to fix. I can't count the number of racist comments I've seen on YouTube but onthe same note i cant count the number of whites or wannabes that try their hardest to pretend that it doesn't exist. FWI we are NOT blind or STUPID for that matter and we refuse to take any kind of racism laying down. I've had enough of covering my eyes am gonna come out swinging. For those of our race who have been subdued, I feel terribly sorry for yo and shall keep you in my prayers.

    But for the others who believe in givin our race good role models, supporting interracial friendship, and makin this world a bit better for the non-white young I say ROCK ON FELLAS! You rule!!!!! I know if I had had someone of my race to truly consider my role model I wouldn't have had half as many problems with myself as I did! But what can I say I dot regret it cuz in makes you strong. So BLASIAN blog keep doing what ya do!

    My favorite quote: "Be the change you want to see!"

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