9.30.2012

When Was Your First Racist Experience?

           “Ching-chong-ching”, “Rice Maker”, “Chink”, and “Jap” were some of the words he said to me as he placed his fingers to the sides of his eyes and pulled them back in a racist way as he looked at me.  This was the beginning of many experiences I have had.  You would think other people who have been in similar situations would have come to my rescue but instead I was told to “ignore those kinds of things and do not bring attention to it. Only bringing attention to it makes it worse.” 
But how could I ignore something that made me so mad? Outside looking in, nobody cares what you really are.  They only try to compare you to what they know so they can get a laugh at your expense.  The people in class just laughed and thought it was funny.  I didn’t know how to react in those situations so I did my best to ignore it.  Even when it was over, I was thinking “What did I do to him?, “Why am I different?,”  Why am I the only Asian kid in this school?” I even looked around looking for someone to help and stand up for me, but no one did.  I don’t know if it’s just because they didn’t care or just because they didn’t want to get involved. There were times when I didn’t even want to go to school.  As a kid growing up, it really feels horrible knowing that you are almost completely alone with no one to talk to about it, so you try your best to fly under the radar and not be noticed just so you can “fit in”.   And that’s exactly what I did.  I kept silent and made sure not to become someone like them.  I never called anyone a racist name or gave racist gestures back to them but why was it okay for them to do it to me?  The answer is, it is not okay.

           When was your first racist experience?  This question has been asked to me so I thought I would share this experience in hopes of teaching other people that being silent when things like this happen is not okay if you want to make a change.  In essence, teach people how you want to be treated and what is acceptable and what is not acceptable. 
There are several stories and experiences like this that I have heard from so many different people from Asian-Americans to African-Americans and so many others.  Experiences that go a lot further than just being made fun of verbally with racist remarks.  Experiences where people have been physically assaulted and even killed for just being different.  As a result of my own personal experiences and listening to other peoples’ experiences, it has inspired me to hopefully be the strength for others whose voices cannot be heard and whose pain is so familiar.  The voice of people who have felt alone, powerless, upset, and angry.    
           We can change how things are right now. We as people need to do better.  We need to come together to stand up for what is right.  Our differences make us stronger. Stand up for people who are treated unfairly just because of the way they look or where they come from.  If you were in the shoes of the person in this situation, wouldn’t you want someone to stand up for you or your son, daughter, brother, or sister?  You can make a difference and be apart of making a positive impact in the world.  Be the change that you want to see. To the people who have been involved in similar situations like these, you are not alone.
Feel free to share your stories and experiences with me.  When was your first racist experience? What did you do?  How did you feel? Looking back, what would you have done differently?  We can learn from each other, support each other, and become Stronger together.

50 comments:

  1. I was about 8, I was at camp, and it was my first time dealing with "White Tears".

    I grew up in Chicago and went back and forth living on the South and North side of town, so I grew up being friends with black, white, latino, asian, etc...

    Anywho, I am the type of person to get along with people until you cross me. I went to summer camp and it was one of the worst experience I had, and I had been to other camps before without any problems.

    On the bus on the way to camp I was sitting next to this white girl(Can't remember the girls name because I didn't want to). She seemed nice and we talked about cartoons and whatever else you do when you are that age.

    So as we get to camp, you get put in groups and where you are going to stay. So she was a part of my group and we stayed in the same cabin with 10 other kids. So I tend to make friends easily, but she was kind of awkward I guess is the right word to say about her. I guess she thought I was supposed to stick with her throughout camp.

    During camp my allergies flared up, the counselors at the camp wern't up to par so I really wasn't having a good time, but to make it worse the white girl accused me of spitting in the lemonade.

    We were outside doing crafts so I was at a table doing something with popsicle sticks. Where the lemonade stand was was like at the end of tables which were about 3 stacked to gather on each side. They had the lemonade in one of those coolers that has the spigot so you just push down on the button and lemonade will come out.

    So basically people were in their own world not really paying attention what's going on especially the camp counselors. Next thing we hear is the white girl crying. I mean like someone had ran up to her and stole her money crying.

    So the counselors run over and asked her what's the matter and she said she got spit in her lemonade. So they asked her how did that happen, so she pointed to me and said I spit in the lemonade, and proceeds to show them the supposed spit in the lemonade.

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    1. Part 2:

      I know I'm writing this as a adult but I really did look at her like "Bitch! Are you out of your damn mind!"

      So everyone is looking at me, the counselors come up to me and ask me why did I spit in the lemonade. And I'm thinking to myself are you guys really questioning me why I spit in the lemonade?! Now I'm eight and I'm not stupid, so I asked the question, how am I'm going to spit in the lemonade when the lemonade is covered. Why are you taking her side and you didn't see or have any proof that I spit in the lemonade. She spit in her own lemonade. But no, all the counselors (Black and white) could see were white tears.

      I know this might sound crazy especially since I was young but at that moment it clicked in my head and I knew what was happening, the stuff you over hear from family, what you saw on tv, was happening to me, "White Tears".

      So they told me to go to my cabin and of course the other kids looking at me all crazy. I was hurt emotionally, I wanted to go home,and I had 3 more days to go. I know one thing, if you were going to accuse me of something it was because I beat her ass, and I didn't get into fights but I was going to start one at that point. So of course I didn't speak to the crazy white girl, I ignored her and stayed to myself.

      But here is the tripped out part, when it was finally time to go home and we all got back on the bus, this heffa actually thought she was going to sit by me with all smiles on her face.

      Where they do that at?....

      But I got her ass back. When the bus pulled in you can see the parents waiting. I saw my mom by the car. Me and the girl were towards the back so we were going to be the last off. She was sitting in another seat by the window. I got up and smacked the shit out of her. Got off the bus like nothing happened and told my mom let's go and hopped in the car. I told my mom what happened and of course she was pissed off, then she got mad at me because I didn't call her and let her know what happened. "sigh"

      I know this was long, but that experienced always sticks with me. It made me aware of peoples motives and where to place people as far as boundaries.

      I didn't know the meaning of "White Tears" until I got older but that day without me knowing I experienced it.

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    2. >>>>> Thank you so much @Meanie for sharing a part of yourself with us. I really appreciate it. This is the first time I've heard of this but I'm happy that you're okay. Hope you have a great day!!!

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    3. @Meanie, you are AWESOME for giving that girl what she deserved. It really frustrates me that even at such a young age, white kids know that they can use POC as scapegoats for their f*cked up behavior and get away with it without being questioned. I hope your slap knocked some sense into her. You are awesome. :)

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  2. I think it was when I was about 6 or 7 and hearing my white childhood BFF from next door telling me white people were the best.

    White kids were perfectly cool up until then, but they got a hell of a lot more obnoxious after that, especially when I left the US and returned from Cameroon some three years later.

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    1. >>>>> Thank you @Ankhesen!!! What's it like in Cameroon?

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    2. Lots of Asians, actually, mostly from Western Asia. Very laid-back, very calm, very beautiful.

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  3. I don't really have a direct racist moment but I can tell you about the first "micro aggression" that I have experienced. When I was a kid, I was in the girl scouts. My troupe was very active and we traveled to all sorts of states along the east coast. Well, I was about ten or eleven at the time and we stopped at a restaurant in North Carolina. My friends and I had gone to the restroom after a long bus ride. As we were finishing up, this old white lady comes into the rest room and looks at us with absolute disdain on her face. The kind of what the hell are you doing hear look. It took me aback because I have never felt so unwelcome before. My friends and I had left and we looked at each other and did not say anything.

    AC

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    1. >>>>> Thank you so much for sharing. I really appreciate it. :)

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  4. Uh, does racism from other PoC count? Since I've yet to receive direct racism from white folk :I

    Let's see, when I was sneered at by other Chinese (inter-ethnic racism) for not being able to speak/read/write Mandarin & not keeping up with Mandopop or some other crap like that. When the Indian owner of a restaurant eyed me suspiciously as I was having dinner with my godmother, her daughter & son-in-law, just because I ate with my hands? Or when one of the guys in my company refused to follow my orders when I stood in for the Captain who was down with a sore throat, during my 3 month National Service stint? Saying instead that he refused to take orders from "a Chinese pig". Or even that moment when I spoke to some African college students who were drunk and complaining feebly griping that Botswana & Zimbabwe were being overrun by chinks & currymunchers, threatening the native peoples out of their jobs & livelihoods?

    Yeah, life is good. And I take that back, yes I have experienced racism by white people. When a bartender pointedly ignored me even after I stood there for a good 10 minutes while he served the other white patrons, some who came AFTER me. Only when I cleared my throat did he deign to look at me with a what-are-you-doing-here expression and serving me my beverage, not once letting his eyes off me.

    And I bear no malice to anyone because of this. Frustration & distaste, yes. But I also learn to take life with a pinch of salt, and to cherish the milk of human kindness where ever it may be.

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    1. For Rob and everyone on Blasian Narrative:

      http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mb6ue8ggXy1r3vnf2.gif

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    2. >>>>> Thank you so much @Zydar for sharing!!! I really appreciate it. Feel free to find me on facebook. :)

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  5. Hmmm..my first time that I suspected to be victimized by racism was at 16.

    When the scandal about Jerry Sandusky came up, it had me to think about my visit Penn State University . It had me to think about a trip my friend and me took on our way there, in a small town about 20 miles outside State College, Pa.

    It took place at a then self-serve gas station. There was a man who reminded me of someone from the Andy Grffin Show. His overalls were looked worn, kind of looked like a solemn faced Kenny Rogers and the station itself looked as if it had its last years. He was standing waiting for the next customer to be served. 5 of them got their gas( and all were White) and he smiled at all of them,but the story changed soon as we got to him. The gas attendants peachy colored skin turned pinkish red ans his smile was replaced by his initial somber expression. It was like we was angry with us.. he looked like a literal redneck.

    Racism wasn't the first thing on our minds,but things seemed to worsen when we went to get a smack. There was another White guy at the cash register and he was looking at us,but not the White patrons, like were going to steal something.We had it gave back our snacks to him, paid the gas and told the men that we feared that they going to put arsenic in our snacks because of their racist ways. From there, we went to State College. If that wasn't enough, I went without winter gear. It was my second time being in the North( been to DC, Maryland for a family reunion). Being from Georgia, I forgot that it would be cold there..even in spring..as it was 80 degrees and hot there,while it was 41 with snow there. Im surpised that I didn't get sick after the fact.

    My teacher asked did I want to go there, I knew that I wouldn't want to for one it was too much money, that I wouldn't be able to handle those possible blizzards they may have had and during the time and at the time, I was left with a sour taste in my mouth about that part of Pennsylvania. As a kid my folks would teach me about my heritage and about life. They would tell me that not everybody will like me for me and that every race, including my own Black people has it good/bad in it. Still it hurt me like I was strung by a wasp and the pain lasted for days. You hear it all of the time,but I didn't want to think that it could happen to me,but it did.

    Mom and Pops were right. Everybody will not like you because of your race. Penn State wouldn't be the only time that I have had to deal with racism and Im quite sure that it won't be the last. Unfortunately, as a minority and as a Black woman, this is something that I will always expect until I die. Experience is the best teacher and I've learned a lot from that ordeal. I may make you mad for a second,but I don't let get me down and I refuse to. That is one war I'm going to make sure that my oppressors will never win.

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    1. >>>>> Thank you so much for sharing a piece of yourself @M!!! I really appreciate it. Sorry that you had to go through that.

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  6. Hi,

    I have been lurking here for a month or so. My first racist experience is being chased by a car load of white guys one summer. I was raised in a mixed neighborhood (black, Latino, and few white families). This was waaaaaay back in the day so kids did not have video games to occupy their time so we played outside. We also did not have the big problem of being kidnapped left and right. We always had enough sense to go off to play with at least one other person if not a big group. This time though it was just me and a kid from across the street. A friend of mine named Junior and I were walking back from the park when someone started yelling at us. I lived about a mile from the park. At first we did not know who it was because they were coming up behind us. We turned around and they yelled again. "Hey N****R get your a** over here!" I thank God this was back before childhood obesity and we ran like crazy back to the park since it was closer. A group of high school guys always played ball up there in the summer like clock work. The courts were separated by tall hedges so all they could hear was someone yelling N****R. We burst through the hedges. The white guys not knowing what was on the other side had gotten out of the car to foot chase us. Four people to twenty do the math. As Martin Lawrence said on his show one time. "How do you want your a** whopping?" Thankfully it was before the day and age of shooting someone. About four years later there was one last KKK rally in downtown (Charlotte) before the city tried to shed that image. Those were my first experiences that others considered me different. Or that THEY had a problem with my difference. Sorry for the long rambling post. Keep up the good work! I'm still making my way through all that I have missed.

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    1. Hey, Lor! Welcome to the Narrative.

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    2. >>>>> Thank you @lor for sharing a piece of yourself with us!!! I really appreciate it. :)

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    1. It's nice to be back Ankhesen!!! Thank you soooo much. I see you've been extra busy. btw, Thank you for sharing some of yourself in the comment section. :)

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    2. And what a way to come back. Almost 30 comment in, what, 24 hours? Damn, Robert!

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  8. Mine was like Robert's. They didn't let me drink from the drinking fountain. And my Kindergarten teacher called me an animal. She made me go into the bathroom when she disapproved of my 'animalism'. I never told my parents.

    When the daughter was age 4, I was already teaching her about the things people may say or do. I teach her it's ok to hit back, I'll handle the consequences. Her bestie is a blasian boy, and his parents teach him the same minus the hitting. It's different when a boy hits, esp when he's brown with curly hair. This stuff is no joke.

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    1. >>>>> Thank you @jnguyen for sharing with us!!! I really appreciate it. :)

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    2. You sound like my mom Julie! My mother told me if someone hits me to "Hit them back!" I don't know if this is just a New York thing but my mother was like that. My daughter just started kindergarten and her school is primarily Black/Latino/Asian. There are very few white children in the school.

      These accounts are something else...

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  9. My experiences are a bit different from you guys (so far). I think I have said this before, I grew up in a all Black city. Black mayor, Black teachers, Black business owners, nice Black middle class so I guess I grew up what Rush might call "uppity". I never held my tounge or my head down about being Black cuz being Black was/is the sh*t. Anywho one of the first experiences I had was after college on a job interview where the white woman who was interviewing me stopped the interview to make me feel better by telling me that the company hired people like me and that they tended to work in the back.....

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    1. This is not the worse experience....which was up north in Chicago at a professional event for a worldwide major major retailer where I was called a "mutt". In a group of my "peers" this person compared my race and heritage to an animal. Of course in his white mid-western mind he thought it was a funny joke and no harm done.....I wonder how he would have felt it I retorted with a joke about mid-western men and their penchant for fu*king farm animals......something like "I bet the family cow wasn't safe around you....har har har."

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    2. You must be a really sweet person because I WOULD have said it and a lot more!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  10. I grew up in a mostly Eastern European neighborhood. People in my apartment building would not want to get on the elevator with me and my family. They would talk about us in their language but gesture at us to let us know they were talking about us. To this day, I get the occasional stares from my neighbor's out-of-town relatives and I've lived here 23 years.

    I think the worst incident was when I was 7. I was sliding down the high slide when an old woman put her grandchild on the bottom of the slide. I was almost to the bottom and couldn't stop, so I knocked her kid off. Keep in mind I was on the ground from the collision too. I was barely off the ground before this woman ran over and hit me, screaming in Russian. My mother had to get another parent to translate her fury. But my mom made sure to let her know that our was only because she was her elder that she kept all her teeth. After the other lady told her basically how stupid she was for putting her grandkid on the bottom of a high spiral metal slide that kids can't stop on, she wanted to hug me. I was so young I let this old woman hug me, but even then I knew that because I was different, I would be a target.

    By the way, I got off easy. One of my brother's teachers picked him up in front of the class for something another kid admitted doing.

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  11. I've never experienced racism before. However, I believe that the world should come to accept people who they are and not judge people who the color of their skin. Sadly, there will always be racism will always be in this world because there are still some people that cannot accept people by their race. Sometimes it is so bad, they people train their dogs to be racist as well.

    I'm sorry to read all the comments of racism that people have gone through. It's sickening that people can be so cruel. No matter what happens in life, we must ignore people's ignorance and try not to let it affect us. Some people will just always be the same, unfortunately.


    ~Panda Ninja (Brittney Canna)

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  12. I've never dealt with it directly. Like Dulce, I was born and raised in an all black environment (Harlem, New York) so white folks were not (And still are not) a part of my world. Their not a part of my inner circle. I've gotten looks but that's about it, and this was when I was dating an Asian guy. I never understood why white people even gave a damn.

    I'm thankful for where I grew up in a lot of ways. I hear some of the horror stories POC tell of being the only POC in their school or neighborhood and it really does break my heart.

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    1. My life looks like this now, and that's the life I'm giving my girl. So much healthier. I'm so glad to hear stories like yours :D

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    2. Your little girl sounds lucky! My daughter is being raised in the same kind of environment. Its really important for her self-esteem :-)

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  13. A lot of my problems used to come from other PoC. It was kind of harding growing up in the hood of Chicago, when you had a mother teaching you to act with common sense. A lot of what I used to get was being called, "little miss white girl," just because I didn't seek to act like them. I've even had others tell me that I'm obviously not a real black because I don't "look" it and because my hair didn't look like what black hair was "supposed" to look like. It really used to bother me, but looking back, I'm actually glad that I learned to just be me.

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    1. You're preaching to the choir.

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  14. Growing up i got a lot of crap because of who i was friends with and who i dated.
    I'm the kind of person that would make friends with people of all races. i was blissfully unaware of the dirty words and looks when i was dating, my first boyfriend was white and we both got the short end of the stick. people called me a traitor, a guy even told to "Keep F**kin' my slave master"

    My second boyfriend...it was even worse, he was a tall 6ft 7 Italian man and was as sweet as can be. we dated for two years,he decided to take me on a date to my favorite Japanese restaurant. we sat for 5 minuets and the table of guys behind us started calling us vary rude names and used slurs towards me and making gross comments at me.
    It nearly escalated into a fight but the restaurant owner told the guys to leave, on the outside i looked Ok but inside was so hurt by how they could just treat us that way and find it OK.

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    1. The guy who made the slave master comments was probably dating a white woman himself. I love double standards. The restaurant situation would have rattled me and that was their reason for doing it. Were they of color also?

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    2. One of them was the other two looked mixed. ugh the thought makes me cringe.

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  15. I can't remember how old I was, but I wasn't any older than 10yrs old. I went with my mother to get her nails done and one of the Asian guys must have said something along the lines of "I was pretty for a black girl" or something along those lines, because I remember my mother got that 'look' on her face like "I'm trying not to go off on this fool." Then there was an awkward smile, and something said in whatever language they were speaking from the one guy that was doing my mothers nails to the other guy that said what he said. Funny thing is, I didn't even realize what he actually "meant" by what he said until we left and my mother explained it to me. Ahh..childhood innocence.

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  16. I would have to say that I didn't experience what I clearly felt was racism/racist attitudes wasn't until I was in college. I went to a PWI (predominately white institute) that at the time was going through the affirmative action cases. And the idea of the case pissed me off becuase there was an assumption that many of the students of color--okay BLACK students specifically--should not have been there because of their grades and what not. And this spilled into classrooms where I was the only black student in the class. There were serious entitlement issues coming from some white students, just looking for ways to prove that you were an idiot that didn't need to be there. It also meant that no matter what you did you inadvertly became a representative for your group. Any time race came up, everyone was looking at YOU to either go into angry black person mode or be all kumbaya and shit.

    And at the same time, I was also, "not one of THOSE black kids." Again I wasn't told these things, but they're easy to sense. I was the only black student chosen to be a student hostess for visiting Japanese students, and I remember my boss making some not so pleasant comments not only about them and Japan, but also my hometown. I also had a graphic design teacher who seemed to pay me more attention. I think he saw me as the poor black kid with big dreams because he would offer to get me school supplies, gave me way too much praise and compared me (in class) to the only other black student, who was often late to class or missed some projects. LOL yes, I know some of you are thinking, well what's wrong with praise!? But having a good portfolio when you're an art student is EVERYTHING. So I was never really sure if I was good at what I did or if I was just better because I wasn't the other black kid. I didn't know whose standards I were up against. Actually maybe that nasty old man was just hitting on me? Anyway introrospect, I probably should have reported incidents, or called them out one it, but I had already checked out of most things because I was graduating in a few months.

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    1. My first, unambiguous experience with racism was under similat circumstances.
      Because I've posted it here before, I'll summarize:
      Met a friendly white guy during military training.
      Outscored him on a test (100 on my end, 98 on his.)
      Watched him open his mouth and say that it was *impossible* for me to outscore him on a test because "I'm white and he's black."

      To this day, that's my strongest memory from my skills training course, despite the fact that (adding this for emphasis) I was still at that specific base on September 11, 2001.

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  17. I was born and raised in the Dominican Republic, a country of mixed people. My mom looks like the typical latina in terms of skin color, straight hair, all of that. My that is a tall black menace :p my mom always reassured me that I was a beautiful black woman, but around me everybody wanted to be more white!

    I dont remember the first time I feel racism, but I know the one that stuck. I decided to let my hair grow natural when I was 17, a year later I was looking for a Hotel to do my first college internship. I had a 3.8 gpa and spoke 4 languages so it should have been an easy process, but my first choice droped me after a face to face interview, although I had aced the phone interview and they were delighted with my teachers recommendations and grades, why? Because I have natural hair, and according to them that isnt a professional look. Bare in mind that by then my hair was quite short, it wasnt a bif ass fro at all.

    So u r telling me that someone comes from Italy to an island in the carribbean and is going to have a problem with my hair??? I was incredibly mad about it and is one of the fears I have of going back to the island next year, not being able to find a good job because Im TOO BLACK.

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  18. First post on the blog here! I'm enjoying the various articles / postings here. So this is a bit of a deep question but I seem to recall my first "racist" experience was back when I was in 8th grade (around 1987). At the time, I was going to a Catholic School in SF that was based in Chinatown. The student body was primarily Chinese American though there were the occasional non-Chinese/Asian student through the years.

    The Catholic Church at the school had a good history of basketball in Chinatown. A pastor at the Church had formed an amateur adult team called the San Francisco Saints back in the 1940s. However, the school itself had not had teams in a few years (not sure why). However, a new teacher at the school saw this and got permission to form a team.

    During a Christmas tournament game, my team was trailing early. However, we rallied to tie the game but ultimately lost in overtime 48-40. During the game, we had fans / parents (not sure which these days) calling us "F***ing China***". Our coach heard this and yelled back. The calls continued for a while.

    After the game, our team got into it with the other team (or fans). They yelled crap at us and we yelled back. Kids being kids, there were no blows, just a lot of words. It was an experience I definitely remember to this day. One would think that in 2012, this stuff doesn't happen. Yet, I still hear it occasionally from players or parents.

    Some people and things change and some still remain idiotic.

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  19. I'm American, but spent most of my life in Germany. The first time I realized that race still mattered was in the summer of 6 grade. I went to the pool with my friends and this German said "Hey Nigger" It shocked me so bad,I didn't know what to do so I called him a Nazi. (that's like the N-word of Germany) He proceeded started yelling/crying.
    That was my negro wake up call as Paul Mooney likes to say.

    When I got back to the states (freshman year) White people would always asked me if I was mixed. When I would reply no, they would ask if my parents were. When I replied no again, they would proceed with a "are you SURE that they are Black?" (my mom is very light skinned, and could pass for Latino, my dad is Half Choctaw and half Black, but he just goes by Black.)

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    1. You would think that Nazi would know better than to call you a nigger in the first place.

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  20. Is someone going to post about the recent incidents about the black and Asian students being hit with 'water' balloons (they were filled with bleach) at the University of Texas at Austin?

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    1. Wow! Amazing that this is still going on, but I have to say I'm not surprised.

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  21. I've been lurking here a while and love this blog. Anyway, I have a few experiences that weren't really overtly aggressive, but still racist. All happened while in elementary school between '94 and '96. I live Delaware in the boondocks with a tiny black population so I was usually the only black kid, or one of two, so you know I was the appointed black representative for all black people starting at the tender age of 7 -_-. As a result I'd be asked all sorts of insensitive or plain odd questions. White girls would ask if I used frying pan grease in my hair or if I washed it. I remember coming to school with these beautiful box braids and a teacher said, "Oh your hair is really unique! How did you do that? Was it woven like a basket?" Back then I was thinking the kiddie equivalent of "Bitch, is you serious?! You've never seen a damn braid before, let alone done one?!" And the weirdest thing I was asked was by my best friend at the time. This little fast ass child asked me (we're about 7 or 8 at the time) if black men's penises were the same color as the rest of their body. Now how the hell would I know at age 7?! It was like she expected me to know because, you know, all black women are promiscuous and start before kindergarten.... I wish there had been a pair of brass knuckles just lying around back then so I could have fucked up some tracheas.

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    1. Some dumb 7yr old blonde asked me (also at age 7) similar questions... WTF is with those kids?

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    2. Seriously what type of kids did you guys grow up around? At seven the only thing that concerned my was cartoons (Scooby Doo especially) and if we were going to have a snow day (grew up in the South). I'm being honest I don't even remember thinking about or knowing what a penis was! Or maybe I just blocked it out. I do know I didn't go around ASKING people about them!

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