11.14.2012

Canada, Stop Hating on Brian Shin

Meet Brian Shin. Talented, well-educated corporate recruiter by day... major marijuana trafficker by night


From the National Post:
After completing a bachelor’s degree in business and a master’s in taxation at prestigious universities, Brian Shin landed a coveted job as a tax consultant with Deloitte & Touche, a global professional services giant. He quit that coveted job, however, when he realized it meant a steep pay cut from his other — secret — line of work.

“He quickly appreciated that he could make far greater income by continuing his marijuana wholesaling enterprise, and he did not have to be bothered with all of those tax obligations he had learned about at graduate school,” said Ontario Superior Court Justice John R. McIsaac.

Shin then began a perplexing double life: by day energetic entrepreneur, accumulating peerless letters of reference, and by night as a career “mega-trafficker” and underworld banker.

“I love my job,” Shin recently enthused, “I make a lot of people happy.”

Although talking about his corporate recruiting, it might also describe his 14-year career among the “marijuana distribution elite,” as he was described in court.

His double life was revealed on Aug. 6, 2009, when Shin arrived at his secret “stash house” and was pounced on by waiting members of Durham Regional Police.

Inside, officers found what Judge McIsaac called “a buffet of illicit drugs.”

Shin’s gunpoint arrest, along with the arrest of 11 others and the seizure of $3-million in drugs, cash, luxury vehicles, expensive jewelry and several residences, was the culmination of Project Isis, a three-month anti-drug probe.

Shin, however, stood out from the pack.

He was talented, ambitious and well-educated, with exceptional prospects outside crime. In his reasons for sentencing, released Tuesday, Judge McIsaac said of Shin: “I doubt that a more glowing assessment has ever crossed a judicial bench.”

Shin started dealing marijuana early in his high school years, he told court at trial. He found it easy money.

14 comments:

  1. When do I start making my 'Free Brian Shin' shirts? lol :D

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    1. Right? He was making serious dough, the kind of dough that makes you want to shrug and say, "Well dang, man...don't hate the player...."

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  2. Too many people fall for that "easy" money.All they see is how quick it is to be a millionaire,but don't see the tragic consequences behind it. If they don't lose their lives,they end up being behind bars. I admit to being mad at Brian.Don't he know how many people wishes that they were in his position? Maybe his job wasn't paying him a desired wage or maybe he succumbed to that big money he was getting behind the marijuana..Idk,but at the end of it all,he should look at this incident and ask himself was selling it worth his what could have been a stellar reputation?He also could have put his folks in danger.If his folks didnt know about it,Brian's actions was also dangerously selfish as well.

    Now on the other side of things,while Brian do deserves some punishment,I thought that 6 years for a first time offender was extreme.I dont know about Canadian law,but it still is extreme.They could have sentenced him to house arrest,strict probation,a year in jail,but6 years for a first timer is extreme.Judging by the tone of the judge he had it in for him.

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  3. Canada needs to take its cue from the great state of Washington, specifically that county which dismissed 220 cases. They signed so many Negroes' freedom papers that day, for a moment I thought we were back in the late 1800s.

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  4. I'm afraid I agree with M here, though on different principles. Drug trafficking is a menace to society, it destroys lives whilst enriching those who profit from it. Granted that marijuana is not as damaging as other forms of narcotics, nonetheless it like everything else has the potential to be abused. Had this been an alternate reality scenario where consumption/sale/purchase of marijuana was legal, then it would be another thing altogether. Mr Shin's lucky he's not from Malaysia, Indonesia or Taiwan. Over in M'sia, trafficking more than 400 grams (about the size of half a bag of sugar) earns you the hangman's noose.

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    1. Well, it's nice to have you back!

      I'm actually torn on this one. For one, it's marijuana, and in the US our big problems right are crystal meth, heroin, and prescription drug abuse. Had Shin been involved in that mess, I'd be singing in a different tune. But that's the US...and Shin's in Canada.

      Marijuana is not and never has been a devastating problem here; in fact, before it was banned it was considered "the poor man's cigar".

      Over in M'sia, trafficking more than 400 grams (about the size of half a bag of sugar) earns you the hangman's noose.

      DAMN!!!

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    2. Over in M'sia, trafficking more than 400 grams (about the size of half a bag of sugar) earns you the hangman's noose.

      Just this morning, I heard of them finding $7.something million U.S. dollars worth of cocaine being smuggled in coconut milk in Malaysia. Trust me, someone's crying bitterly over that - as well as sweating bullets.

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  5. He deserves to go to jail. Not for marijuana distribution, but for being stupid and greedy. If he was earning so much money that a six-figure job was chump change, he should have been smart enough to either quit or leave Canada at Year 10. Instead, he's just a richer version of the guy from the projects who pulls in $100,000/month but still dresses and acts like a hoodlum. When Pookie or Rayshawn gets caught (and the local news talks about how he was bringing in $250k a month), we say that Pookie was greedy and stupid. The circumstances shouldn't change because the criminal isn't black or ostensibly "ghetto".

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  6. It's the "Cream Team" all over again. The top guys were just *sitting* on millions of dollars in cash. A *smart* person would think, "I have $5,000,000 in unmarked bills in a pair of duffel bags. But, the blocks are getting hot and the Po is catching all of our soldiers. I could *take* this 5 mil, drive to Tampa, slide 100 grand to a ship's captain and a couple of bully boys, drift down to a Leeward Island and get to Brazil with millions to spare and no extradition." Instead, they fancied themselves untouchable.

    What makes more sense: show up in Switzerland or Andorra with wads of cash and a cover story about winning the Lotto (a story that would never be checked if you were willing to salt the trail with Benjamins), or lounging around in a country that *loves* to put minorities in jail?

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    1. A *smart* person would think, "I have $5,000,000 in unmarked bills in a pair of duffel bags. But, the blocks are getting hot and the Po is catching all of our soldiers. I could *take* this 5 mil, drive to Tampa, slide 100 grand to a ship's captain and a couple of bully boys, drift down to a Leeward Island and get to Brazil with millions to spare and no extradition."

      ...(a story that would never be checked if you were willing to salt the trail with Benjamins)...


      Uh, is there something about you we need to know???? 'Cause, like...damn.

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    2. You know what. Compared to the bankers CEOs, and private companies that not only made millions in drugs, fraud, Ponzi schemes and shit that have crippled our economy but destroyed everyday people, Shin as far as I'm concerned doesn't even rank.

      And how many rich white men have we witnessed do some illegal and nefarious shit and we don't even blink an eye about?

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    3. And how many rich white men have we witnessed do some illegal and nefarious shit

      ...and not spend a single day in jail? I'm not saying Shin is totally innocent or that he doesn't deserve punishment. He had a job AND a salary many folks would kill for. After high school, he should've retired from "the biz" and sat his ass down somewhere.

      Or done what Mamu said which, to me, is the best option of all.

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  7. I think this guy is just greedy and entitled.

    There used to be a show on BET that was like A&E’s Biography but for big-time ‘hood’ drug dealers. And to me at least, there seemed to be a number of reoccurring themes.

    -Most were extraordinarily bright.
    -At some point pretty early on in their ventures, things went from an understandable desire to shore up the financial well-being of their families, or generate some seed money for a legit biz or rainy day fund, to craven, outright greed. Subsistence level drug dealing is one thing, but how many Cadillacs, fur coats, and gold medallions does one person need?
    - I also think many of them were sociopaths. Many seemed to have a pretty callous disregard for others, and were unapologetic about thinking that they were above playing by the same set of rules that the rest of us schmucks have to play by. Believing that drug use and the narcotics trade should be decriminalized is one thing. That’s a fair debate to have. But as things currently stand in Canada, selling marijuana IS apparently illegal, and if the vast majority of Canadians have to get up, schlep to their 9 to 5s, and scrape by the best they can on an honest day’s work, why should Shin be any different?

    Something like a billion people on planet Earth have to make do on less than a few dollars a day? And this guy’s six-figure corporate gig wasn’t good enough?

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  8. All I am going to say, is that there is a movie in here to be made. Who's with me?

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