12.19.2012

2011: China condemns American treatment of Afro-descendants and other minorities

(h/t Erica)

Originally published in the San Francisco Bayview by Raushana Karriem, Posted: May 19, 2011. Reblogged from New America Media.

In a scathing report issued by China’s Information Office of the State Council, China condemned America’s treatment of its Afro-descendants and other minorities and cited America’s numerous human rights violations against its minorities.

“The State Department of the United States released its Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2010 on April 8, 2011. As in previous years, the reports are full of distortions and accusations of the human rights situation in more than 190 countries and regions including China. However, the United States turned a blind eye to its own terrible human rights situation and seldom mentioned it. ‘The Human Rights Record of the United States in 2010’ is prepared to urge the United States to face up to its own human rights issues, “ states the report.

The report cites that Afro-descendants make up 50 percent of the homeless in Los Angeles, California, and have a 32 percent unemployment rate nationwide.

According to a report of the Working Group of Experts on people of African descent to the Human Rights Council of the United Nations in August 2010, unemployment was a very serious issue for the Afro-descendant community in the United States, with levels of unemployment being, proportionately, four times higher among this population than in the white community.

Reference was made to a case where the New York City Fire Department was found to have discriminated against people of African descent who had applied for employment as firemen. Of the 11,000 firemen employed by the New York City Fire Department, only about 300 were of African descent, despite their being about 27 percent of the population of New York (UN document A/HRC/15/18).

Nearly one-sixth of Black residents in the city were unemployed in the third quarter of 2010. About 140,000 of the city’s 384,000 unemployed residents, or 36 percent, were Black (The New York Times, Oct. 28, 2010).

Poverty proportion for minorities is also high in the United States. The U.S. Census Bureau announced in September 2010 that the poverty proportion of the Black population was 25.8 percent in 2009, and those of Hispanic origin and Asian were 25.3 percent and 12.5 percent respectively, much higher than that of the non-Hispanic white at 9.4 percent.

The median household income for the Black, Hispanic origin and non-Hispanic white were $32,584, $38,039 and $54,461 respectively (The USA Today, September 17, 2010).

A survey released by the America Association of Retired Persons on Feb. 23, 2010, found that over the previous 12 months, a third (33 percent) of African-Americans age 45-plus had problems paying rent or mortgage, 44 percent had problems paying for essential items, such as food and utilities, almost one in four (23 percent) lost their employer-sponsored health insurance, more than three in 10 (31 percent) had cut back on their medications, and a quarter (26 percent) prematurely withdrew funds from their retirement nest eggs to pay for living expenses.

Even in the tough employment environment, 12 percent of African-Americans age 65 and over returned to the workforce from retirement, while nearly 20 percent of African-Americans age 45 to 64 increased the number of hours worked and 12 percent took a second job (The Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23, 2010).

In 2009, there were more than 30,000 Black children living in poverty in the nation’s capital, almost 7,000 more than two years before. Among Black children in the city, childhood poverty shot up to 43 percent, from 36 percent in 2008. In contrast, the poverty rate for Hispanic children was 13 percent, and the rate for white children was 3 percent (The Washington Post, Sept. 29, 2010).

USA Today on Oct. 14, 2010, reported that African-American boys were suspended at double and triple the rates of their white male peers. At the Christina School District in Delaware, 71 percent of Black male students were suspended in a recent school year, compared to 22 percent of their white male counterparts. African-American students without disabilities were more than three times as likely to be expelled as their white peers. African-American students with disabilities were over twice as likely to be expelled or suspended as their white counterparts (USA Today, March 8, 2010).

The health care for African-American people is worrisome. Studies showed that nearly a third of ethnic minority families in the United States did not have health insurance. Life expectancy was lower and infant mortality higher than average (BBC, the social and economic position of minorities). Mortality of African-American children was two to three times higher than that of their white counterparts.

African-American children represented 71 percent of all pediatric HIV/AIDS cases. African-American women and men were 17 times and 7 times, respectively, more likely to contract HIV/AIDS than white people and twice as likely to develop cancer.

Racial discrimination is evident in the law enforcement and judicial systems. The New York Times reported on May 13, 2010, that in 2009, African-Americans and Latinos were nine times more likely to be stopped by the police to receive stop-and-frisk searches than white people. Overall, 41 percent of the prison population was estimated to be African-American. The rate of African-Americans serving a life sentence was more than 10 times higher than that of whites.

Males of African descent who dropped out of school had a 66 percent chance of ending up in jail or being processed by the criminal justice system (U.N. document A/HRC/15/18). A report said 85 percent of the people stopped in New York to receive stop-and-frisk searches over the past six years had been Black or Latino (The Washington Post, Nov. 4, 2010).

According to a report of the Law School of the Michigan State University, among the 159 death row inmates in North Carolina, 86 were Black, 61 were white and 12 were from other ethnic groups. During the trial process of the 159 capital cases, the number of Black members taken out from the jury by prosecutors more than doubled that of non-Black members. According to statistics from the Chicago Police Department, the proportion of Black people being the criminals and the victims of all murder cases is the highest, reaching 76.3 and 77.6 percent respectively

In conclusion, The People’s Republic of China demands that America stop using their cry of human rights violations against other sovereign nations in order to declare war on them to steal their resources when America flagrantly violates the human rights of Afro-descendants and other minorities within its own country.

This story first appeared in Muhammad Speaks. Editor Raushana Karriem can be reached by writing to Editor, 3040 Campbellton Rd, Atlanta, GA 30311 or emailing muhammadspeaksletters@yahoo.com.

See Also

The White Papers

37 comments:

  1. "In conclusion, The People’s Republic of China demands that America stop using their cry of human rights violations against other sovereign nations in order to declare war on them to steal their resources when America flagrantly violates the human rights of Afro-descendants and other minorities within its own country."

    :) Say it again.

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  2. I wonder if China is trying to make a play to African-Americans? Since China is investing in Africa and African nations were the ones who supported China to be included in the U.N. maybe they are looking to invest in the U.S.-born descendents of Africa as well.

    We have a history in the US between African-Americans/Africans and Asians although a lot of people don't mention it in history books. You had the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1870 and it was Frederick Douglass and Augustus Straker spoke out against the bill.

    Ho Chi Minh was an admirer of Marcus Garvey, Japanese Americans involvement with the Black Panthers, W.E.B. DuBois visited China, Manchuria and Japan and the list goes on.

    African Americans have a lot of spending power and if China could woo Blacks into moving to China, or back to Africa with a promise of a more prosperous life it will cripple the U.S. and have China as the number 1 super power.

    Not saying it would happen because China got their own problems with human rights and many African-Americans would feel like they sacrificed too much to let America go. So just speculations going through my mind, its gives you something to think about.

    A History of Linkage:By Yuri Kochiyama

    -Meanie

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    1. Interesting perspective. Very well thought out.

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  3. At this point, I wish China would take heed of its own advice because they are heading down the same road with the US when it comes to folks of African descent. This is only even more obvious as the number of Black people in China grows.

    How about China stops with its overly strict restrictions on Africans applying for visas to legally enter the country? Or stop treating Black folk like shit at their border because we're all "negative influences". I can understand xenophobia to an extent a lot of Chinese are xenophobic, but their anti-Black racism draws so much from Western cues. And these days they can't be claiming ignorance any more, why does Darkie, opps I mean Darlie toothpaste still exist?

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    1. True as well, but I don't think that China's protesting its innocence here so much as its telling America that its shit does stink, and it stinks 'round the world. That America tends to seize the moral high ground in the human rights area is laughable. In America, you're entitled to human rights so long as you're white, heterosexual, able-bodied, and male.

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    2. I agree. But in addition I'd like to add that as bad as the anti-black racism may be in China, of the East Asian countries China is in my opinion the most likely to develop tolerance and acceptance of the African people(s) and the reason is rooted in China's history.

      Since the beginning of the Chinese civilisation the Chinese people have been going through a constant process of interaction and integration with different ethnic groups. This is evidenced by the fact that many of the regional populations who we now commonly recognise as "Han" in China (e.g. the Cantonese and the Hakka) were actually once regarded as non-Han outsiders.

      Further, the fact that China has managed to hold together more than 50 ethnic groups as one unified and, by and large, peaceful nation should count for something. Say what you will about the government's policy on Tibet, but the fact is that China has preserved Tibet's culture and, more importantly, kept the people alive. The same can't be said for the Native Americans and the Indigenous Australians who were brought perilously close to complete wipe-out through genocide and whose traditional cultures are now functionally extinct, as a result of white colonisation.

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    3. @Ankh I understand this, the US trying to take the moral high ground is very laughable. I think China is great for calling the US out, but at the same time I also think that they should apply the same rules to themselves because this just makes them look like hypocrites.

      For me China has a chance of going either way, and as I plan to be in China for most of next year, I've become pessimistic. Considering the love-hate relationship they have with the US...they just seem to be heading towards that direction where it'll be in China, you're only entitled to human rights so long as you're Han, heterosexual, able-bodied, and male...and this will stretch to include white people because global privilege. If it isn't already this way, I mean brown people have been denied healthcare in Chinese hospitals and I'm yet to hear of a white person needlessly dying because a Chinese hospital refused to treat them.

      @s I beg to differ, I strongly doubt China will ever develop tolerance up to the level of *accepting* African people. I can see them marginally tolerating the presence of Black people, however the way we are being treated in China today is not a good sign at all. If this was coming from just white people I'd dismiss it, but when Africans and Chinese people themselves are warning me about the kind of treatment I'll get when I'm in China coming soon (if the Chinese powers that be let me), then I have to sit up.

      You seem to have glossed over Han privilege, and the way people from minority ethnic groups have been disadvantaged and sidelined in China. When I read about minorities in China, I can honestly draw comparisons with how minorities are treated in other parts of the world, especially when it comes to privilege denial.

      In the future if these minorities become Han, what will this entail, how will their indigenous cultures not be affected? Will minorities be expected to drop certain parts of their cultures to be part of majority? I'm critical of the West's portrayals of China and Tibet, but at the same time I can't agree with what you've said above. I'd also disagree that indigenous cultures in the US and Australia are "functionally extinct", but then again I'm not sure I understand what "functionally extinct" means as from my Nigerian perspective, part of these cultures are still alive so they are not extinct.

      Anyway, if I've learnt anything this year, it is to be wary of all kinds of colonialism and cultural imperialism. It is just a bad when people of colour do it, whether in North Africa or China.

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    4. @CY...

      I appreciate that China may not reach the point of accepting Africans as you say, but I maintain that of the East Asian countries China is the most likely one to achieve that. In Korea, for example, the people still cling to the idea of the "purity" of their race and the need to protect it.

      The point of my previous post is not to deny that discrimination, against any particular group, exists China, but to provide perspective by offering comparisons with other countries as well as making a reference to China's history.

      When you say that minorities in China have been sidelined, which minorities precisely are you referring to? From what I've gathered, the only groups that are disadvantaged socioeconomically in a systemic way (despite generous government support) are the Tibetans, Uyghurs, and to a lesser extent the Mongolians -- and the reason for this is obvious. Most ethnic minorities are more or less integrated and treated fairly while others, such as the Koreans, do very well in the Chinese society.

      If you want to know what happens after the minorities have been integrated, just look at the examples I gave above, i.e. the Cantonese and the Hakka. Their cultures and languages have been preserved and now form part of the greater Chinese culure that we all take for granted.

      Finally, there's a distinction between functional extinction and actual extinction. The best way for me to explain it is to refer to the fate of baiji (the Yangtze River dolphin) as an illustration. This dolphin is/was believed to still exist in the Yangtze River but because the extant number is too small for the species to be biologically viable, it is regarded as being "functionally extinct". That is what has happened to the cultures of the Native Americans and the Indigenous Australians.

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    5. @s

      All Asian countries more or less stick to what you refer to as the "purity" of their race. S. Korea's is a coping mechanism after having to deal with colonisation and attempts to wipe out their cultural heritage from Japan and the US, some will add China to this list.

      Tbh, contrasting discrimination in China with the US will mostly be lost on me because I am someone with little ties/connections to both. My interest in China comes from an academic perspective, I know my share of Chinese history, politics and socio-economy and I am into Sino-African relations. While my knowledge of discrimination in the US comes from blogs. From my Third World citizen perspective, both countries deal out their share of oppression which to me, are more or less equal.

      Yes, the Tibetans, Uighurs and Mongolians...the large majority of people living in border regions because the wealth is still concentrated in the coastal cities. Yes the Chinese government has tried to spread the wealth westward, but that comes with imposing mainstream cultural sensibilities on minorities by trying to regulate cultures and religious expressions. It's interesting, back when I was in the academia, we discussed why it seems it is easier for the Chinese government to grant more autonomy in certain regions over others. There is a huge possibility of ethnic prejudice playing into this, especially the idea that "those people can't govern themselves, we have to help" which is so damn problematic and forms the basis of colonisation elsewhere. The government may have generously supported, but at the same time they have reduced economic autonomy in places like Tibet and Xinjiang while favouring Han Chinese over minorities, encouraging their migration to these areas also increase ethnic tension.

      Government propraganda insists that there is no ethnic discrimination in China and this is reinforced on paper. But the practice is almost the opposite.

      There are now so many Han in Uighur country thanks to government support, and despite laws against this, economic opportunities do not reach the Uighur people. The minorities that have been able to preserve their culture do this at the price of state controls over their cultures and histories. Those that demand more control over their cultural identities face government clampdown. So basically accepting central authority is the price to pay, and in refusing lawful rights are curtailed.

      Seen re "functionally extinct".

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    6. CY, with regard to the "obvious reason" as to why the Tibetans, Uyghurs, and Mongolians suffer socioeconomic disadvantage in China, I was referring to their resistance to Chinese rule. If you're going to treat the majority Han populace with contempt (yes, these minorities do look down on the Han, too) and engage in separatist activities, you can't act surprised when the Han reciprocate and increase the level of restrictions on you.

      Again, I'm not denying that discrimination on the part of the Han exists, but contrary to your belief there's a qualitative difference between what is happening in China and what the white settlers have done (and continue to do) to the native populations of North America and Australia. For one thing, unlike their white counterparts, the Han never set out to exterminate the Tibetans, Uyghurs, and the Mongolians in either the physical/biological or the cultural sense. In fact, in the case of the Mongolians, it was they who invaded China. This is a very fundamental and important difference to note. The restrictions on freedom that you see in Tibet and Xinjiang have nothing to do with the idea that "those people can't govern themselves, we have to help"; it's because there are separatist elements within these regions that need to be suppressed. Your attempt to draw a parallel with the treatment of African-Americans in the US is simply misguided.

      Finally, I reject the suggestion that the Chinese people subscribe to the idea of racial purity for their race a la Korea and Japan. Modern Chinese nationalism is based on the historical experience and cultural continuity of the Chinese civilisation as opposed to any concept of racial purity. You certainly won't find any textbook in Chinese classrooms that promote the need to keep the Han race pure.

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    7. but contrary to your belief there's a qualitative difference between what is happening in China and what the white settlers have done (and continue to do) to the native populations of North America and Australia. For one thing, unlike their white counterparts, the Han never set out to exterminate the Tibetans, Uyghurs, and the Mongolians in either the physical/biological or the cultural sense. In fact, in the case of the Mongolians, it was they who invaded China.

      Bingo!!!!!

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    8. So I'm literally stunned here. Because minorities with relatively little power seeking the self-determination and autonomy that the Chinese constitution allows counts as contempt and separatist? :/

      And trying to regulated cultural practices in border countries doesn't count as controlling culture? I am not attempting to draw any parallel with the treatment of African-Americans in the US, like I said above, I am not familiar with this experience at all. All I see is Black people being discriminated in both countries, and to me they are equally disturbing.

      But whatever, I stand by my earlier comment. Well done China for calling out the US, but please adopt measures to curtail the discrimination of Black people and minorities in your country. I don't know what's so outlier about this.

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    9. The separatist elements in Tibet and Xinjiang are demanding outright independence, not just the self-determination and autonomy granted by the Chinese constitution. Even the Dalai Lama himself has stated that he does not want outright independence from China because that would be tantamount to economic suicide for Tibet.

      But since we've now waded into this topic, what exactly is your position on this issue? Are you in the "Free Tibet" camp? Personally, I support Tibetan and Ugyhur autonomy but it has to be within the framework of Chinese sovereignty.

      In an ideal world, everyone would be able to have their own country if they so chose (and in an ideal world, China would not be the focus of all that was bad and evil in the world). However, in the reality that we've been dealt, it's all about politics and interests, not principles and morals. Setting aside the argument of whether China's rule in Tibet and Xinjiang is historically justified, there is simply no way China would give up either territory for geopolitical reasons. If the Chinese pulled out of Tibet, for example, you can be sure that the US would be there the next day with its guns pointed at China.

      CY, the issue I take with you is your undiscerning criticism of what is happening in China. It's one thing to say that China can do better, but another to say that what China is doing is what "forms the basis of colonisation elsewhere".

      And, just so you know, the Tibetans, Ugyhurs and Mongolians view the Han with contempt for pretty much the same reason that everyone else does. They think the Han are shifty, untrustworthy, and money-driven. I'm sure you've heard the Chinese being characterised as "the Jews of the East", and although I don't like the Euro-centric view that the expression implies I must admit that it's a good way to explain why the Chinese have been persecuted. It's also one of the reasons why the Chinese and the Jews seem to have an affinity for one another.

      *Just a note: I've used "Han" and "Chinese" interchangeably in some parts and this was done to reflect the common view that the two words are synonymous.

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    10. I believe they started out demanding this autonomy, but their position hardened due to the Chinese government cracking down on them as they haven't in other autonomous regions. It is the Chinese government that is worried about them claiming outright independence, because they see this happening in Central Asia. And the reason there are voices calling out for outright independence is because of Chinese actions in those regions, and their restriction of cultural practices.

      I do find similarities with some of China's activities in the border countries and "colonisation elsewhere", this is my personal opinion. Increasing incentives for Han Chinese to migrate into those regions and then restricting economic benefits to these people, yes it reminds me of "colonisation elsewhere". No I haven't heard of Chinese being characterised as "the Jews of the East", and I still don't see the Chinese as being persecuted, not on the same level as they have persecuted others.

      I have no position on the issue of Tibet and Xinjiang, and I'm now wondering why I let myself be drawn into a conversation on minorities in China in the first place. When I mentioned tumblr and BN below, and finding reactions to my comment here funny, I did so because I've invested more time and energy to exploring and sharing more narratives on China, Africa, Chinese in Africa and Africa in China here on the BN. So for my opinions on China to be undiscerning is new.

      Anyway, we're probably not going to agree on anything so I'm done here.

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  4. I was reading this article and your commentary about it.China may have their issues with human rights abuses,but the US has a great deal of them themselves.Everyday,someone is being unjustly imprisoned, being put on the electric chair,beaten by cops etc because of who they are. I can see someone saying the typical:"We're the melting pot of the world,""Communism don't exist here" or" that we have the freedom of speech"... anything to make themselves look honorable and innocent.

    Human Rights violations don't always have to be in China or in some other country.Just violating folks lives to the point where it causes harm to people are human/civil rights no matter whose country its in.There has been plenty of that have taken place here.

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    1. And that's the point. Here in America we need to call it what it is: human rights violations. Not "underprivileged populations" or "some level of inequality", but human rights violations. And the world needs to hold America accountable for them.

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  5. There were no inaccuracies or mis-characterizations in that piece. However...

    I find this whole thing somewhat exasperating. The Chinese government no more cares about the plight of black Americans than the US government cares about the plight of ethnic minorities in China.

    The US targets the Chinese in these white papers on human rights in an attempt to undermine its legitimacy on the international stage, and China swings back by making similar charges against the US. This is all geopolitical gamesmanship. Nothing more, nothing less.

    And frankly, given what I’ve read on this comment thread about anti-black racism in China, I’m definitely “feeling some kind of way” about this critique. It almost feels like the Chinese are using black sociological dysfunction porn to score a political shot.

    I think the salient point is this: with great power, wealth, and influence comes great expectations. Anti-american sentiment is largely grounded in this notion that the US, precisely because of its power and wealth, should be held to a higher standard, and should act in accordance with its stated principals and values. We fail on this front, and the criticism is deserved. But my issue lies with this “America does it too” refrain. The success of China over the last two decades has shifted the goal posts in terms of the world’s expectations. The global community expects more from its superpowers, and China needs to come to terms with that (just ask the US). The US isn’t the only one criticizing Chinese civil society, and if the Chinese really hope to function as a counterweight to US power (economics are important, but there is a soft power element to this as well), then they may well have to take the hits (many of which are legitimate, even if the messenger is flawed), institute the kinds of reforms that will lend them greater moral legitimacy, and allow them to fill the leadership void that’s been created by America’s failings.

    I just take issue with the “other people do it, too" stance that China seems have adopted.


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    1. Thank you for this. Here's a gif.

      It almost feels like the Chinese are using black sociological dysfunction porn to score a political shot.

      We really need to be more critical of China, as Black people. When visiting African countries, Chinese leaders point out how much African cultures have in common with Chinese ones. They call us their "brothers" and "sisters", yet how are people of African descent treated in China? I'm still sour over that Kenyan woman dying because three hospitals denied her treatment when she was on holiday in China. Apparently this happens often, and the only reason that woman's death made the news was because she had political connections in Kenya.

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  6. Let's try this again.

    The reason I posted this article was not to deflect American human rights violations - which are not nearly discussed enough as human rights violations - onto China's human rights violations, which have been discussed almost to the point of overkill. It's gotten so that "China" and "human rights abuse" have practically become synonymous.

    Meanwhile, if you trotted out all of America's human rights violations, they would bury the Chinese tenfold. This is not to absolve the Chinese. This was to get a discussion going about America as a human rights violator.

    Millions of POC in America die because the societal system is designed to block them from health care. In case you're wondering why Obamacare was fought so heartily, it was fought because it grants coverage to millions of black and brown people who wouldn't have had it otherwise.

    So for every black person who's been turned down health care in China, there's millions more over here in the supposedly wealthiest, most powerful, most advanced nation on earth tasting health care for the first time...in the 21st Century.

    Why is that not being discussed here? The commentary so far has been indicative of global social conditioning. We read the name "China" and we skip over an even greater human rights violator to pounce (this isn't the first time, by the way). China is constantly being taken to task for its fuck-ups, but at the global level, no one properly holds America accountable for anything. Native American genocide? Enslavement of Africans? America's war in the Philippines? Jim Crow? Racial profiling? The culture of violence? Its rape culture? The War on Drugs? The War on Terror? Abu Ghraib? Gitmo? Aerial drones? The racist meltdown in the Age of Obama?

    Sure these issues are talked about in semi-Bohemian social justice circles online, but where are the international courts ripping America a new one and ordering it to get its act together?

    America loves to attack China, and other countries of color, but conveniently ignores their histories of being colonized and demoralized, resulting in hyper-militant natures, internalized & externalized racist thinking, and overall socioeconomic disparities. People righteously demand China and other such countries to "get their act together", but who's putting that same pressure on America?

    This would've been a great thread to discuss that. Forgive me, but to read something like:

    African-American children represented 71 percent of all pediatric HIV/AIDS cases. African-American women and men were 17 times and 7 times, respectively, more likely to contract HIV/AIDS than white people and twice as likely to develop cancer.

    or

    Racial discrimination is evident in the law enforcement and judicial systems. The New York Times reported on May 13, 2010, that in 2009, African-Americans and Latinos were nine times more likely to be stopped by the police to receive stop-and-frisk searches than white people. Overall, 41 percent of the prison population was estimated to be African-American. The rate of African-Americans serving a life sentence was more than 10 times higher than that of whites.

    and automatically jump for China's jugular confounds me. There's a reason why I focused on this part right here:

    ...China demands that America stop using their cry of human rights violations against other sovereign nations in order to declare war on them to steal their resources when America flagrantly violates the human rights of Afro-descendants and other minorities within its own country.

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    1. Ankhesen, the China-bashing phenomenon is basically attributable to one reason: there's just something about China that inspires fear and hatred like no other country. Some blame the decades -- centuries even -- of Western cultural dominance for this, but I think the source of anti-Chinese sentiment is more instinctive, more primal. Just look at all the Asians that also hate China (the persecution of the Chinese in SE Asia, for example).

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    2. there's just something about China that inspires fear and hatred like no other country.

      There really is, and I get concerned when people play into it because fanning the flames of anger towards China directly impacts Asian minorities - regardless of ethnic origin - in the US, where are they are far more vulnerable. People often forget that Vincent Chin, for example, was murdered out of anger towards the Japanese.

      Or like it when it becomes "acceptable" to fear Muslims, so much that Sikhs get gunned down in their own temple. People just don't think of the collateral damage bashing of that nature causes.

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    3. You make a great point K but so does cosmicyoruba and shlbshl. There's nothing but reality and truth in what ALL 3 of you are saying. All very valid and relevent. Truth is some people will read this and assume China gives a damn about the injustices against minorities that occur over here when they don't. It's all tic for tac. However, the discussion shouldn't with that small fact alone. Like you said K, where's the strong criticism of America from us here right now???

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    4. Correction: However, the discussion shouldn't *end* with that small fact alone.

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    5. Fair enough. I'm coming from a place where the US is continually criticised for human rights violations, of course the pressure would not be felt because the US holds that much power. And like I keep on saying, yay to China for calling out the US, but I can't put aside the fact that China discriminates against Black people in their own backyard and I don't really get how/if this qualifies as an "automatic jump for China's jugular".

      It's funny, I expressed similar sentiments both here and on tumblr and reactions to my comment are like night and day. I would never have expected my initial comment to drag on the way it has. *shrug*

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    6. I agree. If this article was meant to make us look at US more critically it failed. IF anything, it's making us look at America PLUS outside foreign countries like China more critically!

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    7. "I'm coming from a place where the US is continually criticised for human rights violations, of course the pressure would not be felt because the US holds that much power. "

      AHA! You see, we don't hear it. America believes in the Mandate of Heaven, we have power because we DESERVE power. Lalalala to all you criticizers, classic derailing. So it's nice that a power that CAN make itself heard is finally saying it and we're finally hearing it and fearing it. Oooooo, the pedestal shook.

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    8. I agree that it's nice to hear anyone speak out against the atrocities that white people have inflicted on the rest of the world, but let's be realistic here. No one really takes anything China says seriously, especially when it comes to the issue of human rights.

      Your comments have brought to mind another thought, though. In some ways, I think the presidency of Obama has been a setback for the POC movement. I can't comment too much on how Obama has affected race relations domestically, but on the international arena the election(s) of Obama has given the US a moral authority that it does not deserve. With Obama as the face of the US, for example, it has been a lot easier for the US to sell the "Pivot to Asia" (read containment of China). That said, it remains to be seen how successful the pivot will turn out to be. Many SE Asian nations are already having second thoughts about signing onto the China-excluding TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership) because the US appears more intent on being an export competitor to the SE Asian nations in the Chinese market, rather than a market for SE Asian exports.

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  7. The people criticising Ankhesen and/or the report are missing the point. In that report, China does not pretend to care about African-Americans and it's not claiming "everyone does it" as some kinda excuse for its own abuses. China is simply saying to the US: "STFU, you don't really give a damn about human rights and you just use it as a pretext to further your own interests".

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    1. Couldn't have phrased it better myself.

      Notice how folks are still not discussing American human rights violations. The focus is still on China.

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    2. Then discuss it Ankhesen. How should we go about discussing these violations..

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    3. Human Rights Violations in the lovely USofA simply aren't tagged as Human Rights Violations. It gets divvied up, classic divide and conquer, so there are anti-racist groups, feminist groups, disablist groups, rather than one big HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATION stamp to put on all rape cases, hate crimes, classist theivery, etc etc. We are stuck in a culture of exclusion and it has worked thus far to immobilize any Human Rights Reform here.

      Anyway, that's why I'm here at the BN. Human rights are Human rights everywhere. No one gets a free pass, not even if you're the most powerful in the world.

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  8. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-20693119 <----see

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  9. It's only an act of power between a rising super power vs the West. China too needs to take it's own advice on the treatment of African nationals in its country.

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  10. I am fascinated by the stark examination of history that shows how America chose extermination and assimilation where China manages to retain culture...

    I'm rough on my Asian history, but isn't that what the Mongols did too? Conquered but had no interest in ruling, rather chose to assimilate themselves into the different societies?

    I don't dismiss violations, here nor there, but when I think about what America did to the American Natives compared to what China did/does to the ethnic minority peoples there... They were not assimilated. VN/VN region retained its language through 1000 years of being colonized by China....

    And China never dropped any weapons of mass destruction on anyone yet. Not once, not twice. You see why I feel that the focuse and criticism needs to be on Amerikkka.

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  11. Whoa, looks like I’m a little tardy to the party.

    First, I went back to New American Media’s website to re-read the piece, and I’m having a little difficulty deciphering exactly what information was taken directly from the Chinese report, and what information has been supplemented by the reporter. Is it the entire piece, because the reporter only seems to directly quote the report in the second paragraph? Much in the piece seems culled together from various other sources, but again, I’m not sure and there are no direct links to the Chinese report, so I don’t have much of a reference. Anyways, I just wanted to get a fuller, more accurate picture of the Chinese report before I replied, but it looks like that might not be possible.

    To clarify some things about my position on China:

    -I do not view China as any more or less malevolent or benevolent as any other nation-state acting to further its own interests. Sometimes countries have interests which converge, at other times those interests diverge. So in that sense, China’s really no different from the US or any other country. I’m also perfectly swayed by arguments that assert China’s lack of imperial ambition. So while I’m not claiming to be immune from a social/cultural/political milieu that may posit China as problematic, I certainly don’t think I harbor paranoia or fear or with regard to China’s ascension. And while I also think that there should be space for criticism of Chinese policy and China’s treatment of minorities and black immigrants, points about anti-Chinese sentiment have been duly noted.

    -Pointing to hypocrisy may be useful, but that utility is limited. So China has pointed to America’s dirty laundry, and sure, we’re now clear on the facts, but how has that moved things towards any actionable solutions? Black american people are still…well, black in America, and Chinese minorities are still minorities in China. I’m just not entirely sure how, “STFU, you really don’t give a damn about human rights (EITHER)” is not a deflection that does not move us beyond our respective conditions. So on that, we may just have to disagree.

    So this conversation was supposed to have been about US abuses, okay…

    *exhales*

    How about the fact that VAWA is still languishing without a re-authorization because folks (a motley crew being led by Cantor) are trying to expunge language from the bill that would provide temporary residence to undocumented women who are victims of domestic violence, and would also allow tribal jurisdictions to prosecute crimes (rapes) committed by non-tribal members on tribal lands? Perhaps not so shockingly, non-tribal members can enter tribal lands and apparently commit crimes with damn near impunity because of thorny jurisdictional issues. Cases such as these are supposed to be prosecuted by the US Atty’s Ofc, but end up languishing because they’re simply not a priority.

    Does this qualify?

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