2.28.2015

Ranier M: Black Women Deserve Better

From The Love Life of an Asian Guy:

**If We Don't Love Black Women, Who Will?**
*Society's Constant Disrespect of Black Women*

The racist comments towards 18-year-old Zendaya caused a hurling punch to America's right eye and forced it's citizens to ask, "did we go to far?"

But making fun a Black woman's natural hair isn't the only thing our society has done. We've been chopping down the identity of Black Women for HUNDREDS of years:

We discourage them from playing with toys and instead give them blonde barbies that look nothing like them. We tease them mercilessly for their individual names, calling them "ghetto" and "ratchet." We convince them that their highest achievement in life is to be the arm candy of another man. We look with disgust upon their body types, then turn around and praise a white girl who looks exactly the same. We fail to acknowledge when they graduate from Harvard with PhDs and Masters in Biomedical Engineering and we still pretend like they're ALL on welfare. We treat them like they're always angry and bitter yet, how many killers and mass murderers are Black AND female? And then we strip them of ANY confidence they have left by bashing their natural hair? Hair that they spend HOURS trying to hide so no one will tease them ever again?

What have we left for these women to be proud of?
What aspect of their lives have we NOT fucked up?
What the hell are they to be proud of when all we do is laugh?
Who are they to trust?

Black Women are THE MOST oppressed group in America, and arguably the entire planet. And when you make an ignorant, lazy, racist insult, you chop down at an already fallen tree.

It's up to all of us, especially POCs, to lift up our sisters and allow them to grow. They deserve it. They deserve our attention, respect, and appreciation.

They
Deserve
Better.

8 comments:

  1. Preach it Ranier...Preach it!

    Really. I watched that incident about Zendaya and I had to ask " Why is that when White people want to criticize somebody,it's always the one who looks like crap that want to do it?" Look at Guilliana..C'mon now..do this woman think that the Gorgeous Zendaya would cry over a woman who looks like a dried up Pogo stick?! Black Twitter was even crazier. One poster compared her to a window wiper( lol!) ,while another guy compared her to one of those incredibly thin cartoon characters with broom straws on top of it's head.They described Gulliana to a T. She tried insulting Zendaya about her beauty and her hair and failed miserably. I just find it funny how people praised Kylie Jenner for hers, while insulted Z for be true though it's a hair style from Black Caribbeans ..wow! It's funny how she can say Z's hair smells when she never met the woman? I guess she don't think White folks hair smells and I have smelled some in my day. I'll take the smell of Isoplus anyday.

    Seriously, Zendaya is a beautiful young woman as it is and those dreadlocks..man those dreadlooks made her look even more stunning. . I was happy that Zendaya told her off so eloquently to have a seat. (I could imagine Guilliana expecting her to also be the stereotypical " angry" Black woman, which she would have had that right to be. ) Because of all of these White people continuously wanting to dictate what POC's ,especially should look like then do back , pull a Christopher Columbus number saying that they " discovered" these things..ugh!

    If there is one thing I've learned about White society is that they cannot seem to embrace people's differences. To some of them , the world has to look alike...Everybody has to hair the same hair types, styles, color, body types ,thought etc..racist White folks just want robots( which easily bores me). I love being Black because we aren't alike as we are a very diversified race of people.I remembered going to get my hair done. As I was waiting, I just looking at all of these Black women ( and a couple of men) waiting to get their hair done. I've seen girls with Afro's, braids, straightened, curly hair and a short hair, waiting for it to get done and one of the beauticians in there was a beautiful bald Black woman. Everybody was waiting to get their hair done. As each we're going in and out for their hair. All of these styles..fascinating to look at.

    I want to ask one thing: what makes White society think that being Black is a bad thing? Their idea of beauty isn't Black folks idea of it. What makes some White people think that everybody with straight blonde hair , lighter skin and light skinny bodies are pretty? Do they know how many of them fits this description but aren't? It's like they go through some meat packing facility and for every White person who goes through the line get the USDA's stamp of approval of being pretty because of who they are. it doesn't matter if they are not pretty, since they're White they're automatically such.

    Black women shouldn't have to be ashamed of their differences,If Black women are supposed be so freakin ugly, why do they copy our features? from the hair, lips, body shape ,butts and even as far as our outspokenness and wanting to make money off our hair care products..why do they do it? To me, if we're supposed to be that ugly, They shouldn't want to look like us. It just does to show you who really envies who.

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    1. "If there is one thing I've learned about White society is that they cannot seem to embrace people's differences. To some of them , the world has to look alike...Everybody has to hair the same hair types, styles, color, body types ,thought etc..racist White folks just want robots( which easily bores me)."

      "Black women shouldn't have to be ashamed of their differences,If Black women are supposed be so freakin ugly, why do they copy our features? from the hair, lips, body shape ,butts and even as far as our outspokenness and wanting to make money off our hair care products..why do they do it?"

      Interesting, right? How black features/trends are always being copied. These points remind me of a recent xojane article I read: http://www.xojane.com/issues/zendayas-dreadlocks

      Anyway, I think the original post makes several great points. As cheesy as it sounds though I think change has to start within the black community itself. Until will start supporting each other it will be hard to spark a united for change.

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  2. @ Anonymous - Don't post as Anonymous.

    You made a good point though. When Zendaya starred in that made for biopic about Aaliyah, people were incensed.

    But the criticisms were leveled at the fact that one 1) the movie was made without the consent of Aaliyah's family, 2) because of that legal lack of consent, the music choices featured very poor as was the overall quality of the film 3) Zendaya herself is biracial; Aaliyah was not, and the casting appeared extremely colorist in nature.

    Had Zendaya been cast to play, say, Lena Horne, the backlash wouldn't have been so severe.

    Now, when someone attacks any WOC's body parts, such as dreadlocked hair, East Asiatic eyes, dark skin, etc., they need to be called out, whether we agree with said WOC's career choices or not. It's one thing to criticize Zendaya the Actress's work. It's a wholly other matter to criticize Zendaya the Woman's dreadlocks, derisively making references to weed and patchouli.

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  3. Replies
    1. Unfortunately, she may have caved in as she no longer have them. It's almost as if this incident devastated her. Nonetheless, that letter was well written and spoken. She showed far more maturity than Juliana.

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    2. If I understand correctly, she rocked the look specifically for the red carpet.

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  4. **Nods head in agreement to all the sensibility in this space**

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  5. Hi, I've just read Zendaya's Twitter response to the controversial remarks, and her message appears rather self-contradictory. On the one hand, Zendaya believes that dreadlocks should be seen as a symbol of beauty and strength (almost like a lion's mane, she says) as opposed to the negative stereotypes that white racists commonly ascribe to black people, but on the other hand she suggests that people should refer to India Arie's "I Am Not My Hair", with the implication being that dreadlocks should not be a consideration at all in one's judgement about black women/people.

    That said, I'm not very well versed in this controversy. However, from what I've managed to glean from here I can agree with Zendaya's larger point and Rancic's comments were clearly outrageous for their racist undertones (even if they were unintentional).

    (BTW, I think this blog is pretty cool.)

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