11.04.2015

The Hair Gods are Calling

HAIR HAIR HAIR...AGAIN?
I came across an article about the spiritual nature of hair in the Native American culture. As many black women move from the "creamy crack" to the "juices and berries" (get it? haha) method I wondered about the significance of hair in other cultures, specifically a culture that has always been known to have long, thick, hair. If you saw a black girl with long, black, straight hair it was assumed she had "some Indian" in he...yeah ok. The article refers to human hair as a "biological necessity". It suggests that our hair, when left to grow on its own without any manipulation, can increase vitality, tranquility, and intuition. It addresses something I never realized about Asian hair and the infamous bangs you see them sporting. Since being in Korea, I've heard from Korean women that they wear bangs to hide their flat foreheads. Umm...ok then. Even some of my students would say, "Teacher I want a round forehead like you". 

Interestingly, the article states that:"The bones in the forehead are porous and function to transmit light to the pineal gland, which affects brain activity, as well as thyroid and sexual hormones. Cutting bangs which cover the forehead impedes this process. When Genghis Khan conquered China, he considered the Chinese to be a very wise, intelligent people who would not allow themselves to be subjugated. He therefore required all women in the country to cut their hair and wear bangs, because he knew this would serve to keep them timid and more easily controlled." So then I thought, say what now? Aren't Asian women stereotypically considered the most timid, passive, and submissive women? 

Anyway, Native Americans believe that your hair is your connection to God and mother Earth; your connection to God's thoughts and powers. Cutting the hair is the cutting off of thought from God. Braids symbolize oneness and unity. Each strand woven together physically demonstrates "one mind, one heart, one soul". 

In the article that I read, there is a claim that during the Vietnam War Native American reservations were combed through for young men with outstanding, almost supernatural, tracking abilities. The men chosen were known as the best warriors and good at tracking and survival. Once they joined the ranks and received the standard military haircut, their abilities disappeared and they were deemed failures..."-the older recruits replied consistently that when they received their required military haircuts, they could no longer 'sense' the enemy, they could no longer access a 'sixth sense', their 'intuition' no longer was reliable, they couldn't 'read' subtle signs as well or access subtle extrasensory information." SAY WHAAAATTT! A test was conducted to see if this was actually true. So, Native Americans..some if them, were exempted from military regulated haircuts.

Now, I ain't no fool, so I did more research about this Native Americans in the Vietnam War story and I found that many consider this story a myth. Many believe that the correlation between long hair and heightened carnal functions is utter bullshit. But it does make you think. The links to the articles are below. What do you think? Below are links to the articles and other information on the topic. Peace and Light Good People. 

5 comments:

  1. Quote: "He therefore required all women in the country to cut their hair and wear bangs, because he knew this would serve to keep them timid and more easily controlled.""

    > Ah OK, that's why in some Kdramas, when a character becomes a "bold and angry" person after being betrayed, he changes his haircut and cut the bangs...I guess that was the reason behind it?
    Well, I have no idea if this could remotely be true, the strenght thing I mean. But it does remind me the biblical character who had really long hair but who lost his incredile strenght as soon as someone cut his hair. I'm not saying it's true because of this reference, I'm just seeing somehow a similar reasoning in 2 different areas (or if you want West and East Asia, and Native Americans' America).

    Well, I won't judge others' faith and spirituality so I'll stay neutral on that. But that's interesting. I'd like to see a sort of comparison with some African countries (wether it's completely different or not so).
    All I can say is that I remember my mom told me once not to let anybody do my hair...that it could be a bit negative for me. Now she's not all that superstitious but I don't know...what do you think?

    As for the bangs for both men and women, I did wonder at times why so many of them have them, but I just shrugged it off as a cultural hair trend thing. Well, maybe there's a real reason like you said.

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  2. The article talks about Samson and his long hair in the Bible. But yeah I think I'll look at the correlation between strength and hair/ hair length in Africa. One article did discuss Rastafarians and the not cutting of their locs, but that has more to do with paying respect to the Lion of Judah who was Hallie Salassie...and the hair is representative of a lion's mane. Lol...so much. More research to do.

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  3. All I can say is that I remember my mom told me once not to let anybody do my hair.-My mom used to tell me the same thing!

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  4. Great and interesting topic of discussion.

    I was thinking about a past article about a six year old Native American boy who got suspended for wearing his hair long in school.His parents went on to explain that his hair wasn't about fashion about their religious culture. culture.

    I was just looking at some natural hair styles and braids and thinking about how with many of them you're not allowed to wear on some jobs and/schools because how they may be considered to be " threats" or " distractions". Back in the past White society didn't have high regards of POC hair cultures, now all of a sudden it's a " trend".There is no respect of one's culture and/or religion yet the U.S. is suppose to celebrate all people's cultures.

    And that is my thing with wearing hair in the US. Whether it's wearing braids, Afros, bald head etc..they all have meaning behind them. About a year ago, a young African American Rastafarian boy was told that if he didn't cut his braids off his head that he would get suspended for it and in Florida , a young biracial Black girl was told that she couldn't come to school because she had a really big curly Afro.

    These days, White society want to Columbusize Blacks and other POC cultural norms and classify them as " trends". Here is my thing with that; Cultures are not and shouldn't be for sale and they are not today's/yesterday's fads. Native Americans,Blacks and Asians don't wear their hair in braids just for fashion, Blacks and folks from the South Pacific do not war their hair in Afros as a trend( Fijians have a name for their short fros). There are significant meanings behind these styles.

    Respectfully, in the states, unless you come from a minority /religious group, there is no real binding culture in this country. The American idea "cultural" celebrations( if you want to call it that) of that is doing trends.

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  5. The hair cutting for mourning, keeping loose strands from brush then burning them, braiding and even texture were very interesting pieces to read from the white wolf page. The taking loose strands and burning stood out for me because my mother always did that, I do it as well. I can say that personally whenever my hair was straightened (my hair is naturally kinky/curly) I felt less happy and productive. Is there power in hair? I don't know, hair is dead and without the hair root lacks substantial dna. But when looking at peoples "aura" I wonder if the aura comes from the person or the hair. Still interesting information none the less.

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